More from: trailer tool boxes

Things to Consider before you Buy a Trailer Tool Box

So, you are a new flatbed trucker in the process of getting your rig together so you can start searching for loads. You’ve heard other truckers tell you to purchase several tool boxes to carry all your cargo control supplies. That is good advice. You will probably need at least two boxes, if not more. You’re going to need the space to store all your tarps along with your winches, straps, chains, etc.

tool-box

It might take some time for you to figure out a tool box configuration that works for you. To help you make wise purchase decisions, we have put together a list of things to think about as you are shopping. Don’t hesitate to ask other truckers for their advice as well. You can learn a lot from veteran flatbed truck drivers.

Tool Box Position

The first thing to consider is where you plan to position your trailer tool boxes. Why is this important? Because tool boxes have doors that can get in your way if you don’t place them correctly. For example, consider a tool box that you plan to mount underneath the trailer bed for tarp storage. You have to look at how the door of that box will operate.

Some tool boxes offer doors that open from the top down, protruding outward in the open position. This kind of arrangement might be suitable for a box mounted near the front of your trailer where you are not likely to need a lot of access. But the door could get in the way if that same box is mounted toward the rear of the trailer. A better option might be a tool box with a door that opens from the front and hangs below the box.

Space Requirements

You will require larger boxes to store truck tarps while smaller boxes are suitable for straps, winches, and hand tools. The reality is you might not know what your space requirements are until you have been on the road for a while. So we recommend at least one large box to handle your tarps along with another small box for straps and winches should be fine. You can add additional space in the future if you need to.

Construction Materials

Most flatbed tool boxes these days are made with high-grade aluminum (with steel doors). This sort of configuration gives adequate strength without adding unnecessary weight. Having said that, you can buy some pretty hefty tool boxes that are rather heavy. Just remember that every pound added to your rig has an effect on fuel mileage. The idea is to use as few tool boxes as necessary and to purchase boxes that are as lightweight as possible without compromising strength.

Brand Reputation

As with anything else, the reputation of a given brand says a lot about what you’re paying for. Brand-name products tend to be more reliable than their generic counterparts, hence the fact that they cost more. A higher price tag is certainly warranted when it comes to flatbed tool boxes.

Mounting Bracket Needs

Lastly, you’re going to need mounting brackets to properly secure your tool boxes. Make sure the brackets you choose are compatible with your boxes, or you could find yourself having to rig something up. Should you purchase from Mytee Products – and we hope you will – we have mounting brackets suitable for all the tool boxes we sell.

Tool boxes serve as critical storage space for flatbed truckers. As a new trucker, you are going to find that your tool box needs change over time. Rest assured, Mytee has everything you need for effective cargo control.

Save


Tips for Installing Trailer Tool boxes

Few things are as valuable to the flatbed trucker as the tools in his or her toolbox. It is that collection of tools that keeps the trucker on the road even when minor problems occur. But the safety and security of one’s tools is only as good as the toolboxes used to store them. So when you are installing new toolboxes, you want to make sure they are mounted correctly.

There are different kinds of toolboxes that truckers use. Some are mounted on flatbed trailers, others on the back of a cab, and still others on the sides of a tractor. Trailer tool boxes might be the hardest to install as they are usually mounted on the underside of the bed. Their weight and size make under bed boxes a bit more difficult to manage.

trailer-toolbox

A box that is properly installed provides years of valuable service for the trucker. If you are planning to install new boxes on your trailer, here are some tips you might find helpful:

Tip #1 – Choosing Box Size

Installing new boxes to replace old models is easier if you stick with the same size. Toolboxes come in a number of standard sizes, so it shouldn’t be hard to find what you are looking for. By sticking with the same size, you should be able to use the same mounting brackets and hardware.

Installing new boxes where there previously were none leaves you with a few more options. Consider what you will be carrying and how much storage space you will need. Also, determine before you purchase where you want your toolboxes mounted. Then take careful measurements so you end up with the right size.

Tip #2 – Choosing Mounting Brackets

Very few trailer toolboxes come with mounting brackets included. You will have to buy them separately. There are universal brackets that fit just about every toolbox on the market, as well as specialized brackets for custom boxes. That said, do not just assume brackets will work with your box. Check with manufacturers or sellers to ensure you get the right combination.

Tip #3 – Test Before Mounting

The location of hinges and access panels will determine exactly where on your trailer your toolbox will be mounted. Keep in mind you will need some clearance. It’s always best to test the location for a new toolbox before you mount it. Use a hydraulic jack to lift your toolbox into place, then test it by opening and closing the access panel and checking the box’s position against the bed and any other trailer structures.

Tip #4 – Heavy Duty Hardware

Your trailer tool boxes end up carrying a lot of weight over their lifetimes. Furthermore, they will be subject to constant road vibrations as well as the shock of every bump and pothole you hit. Therefore, do not skimp on mounting hardware. This is one instance in which investing in top-of-the-line parts is always a good idea. Purchase heavy-duty mounting hardware you know will stand up to years of abuse and punishment.

Tip #5 – Ease of Access

Lastly, choosing mounting locations for your trailer toolboxes is as much about convenience as it is utility. Only you know what would be the most convenient locations based on how you do things. Try to locate your boxes where they make the most sense, according to the kinds of work you normally take. You want to spend as little time as possible getting to the tools you need at the times you need them most.