More from: farmers

Drip Diverters: A Smart Solution to a Big Problem

A drip diverter is a purpose-built device intended to capture leaking water and divert it away from sensitive areas. Drip diverters come in many different forms, including the tarps we sell here at Mytee Products. Our drip diverter tarps are ideal for truck drivers, farmers, RV owners, and others.

The most important thing to know about the drip diverter is that it is offered only as a temporary solution to a potentially big problem. Relying on diversion for too long, rather than addressing the root of the problem, only leads to bigger problems down the road.

Drip Diverters on the Farm

We sell a lot of drip diverters to farmers. It turns out that these highly utilitarian products have plenty of great uses ranging from keeping tractor seats dry to making sure feeding areas are not deluged by summer rains. We have even worked with farmers who want drip diverters to protect their hay.

Imagine a barn filled with hay for the winter. Much to the farmer’s delight, the hay stays dry – unless the roof suddenly springs a leak. The last thing that farmer wants to do is climb on top of the barn in the middle of winter to affect repairs. Enter the drip diverting tarp.

The diverter can be hung from the ceiling directly underneath the leak. Then it can be angled in such a way as to divert the water away from the hay. This is not a solution we would recommend long-term, but it will get the farmer through until nicer spring weather allows for roof repairs.

Truck Drivers and Drip Diverters

If you think truck drivers do not have any use for drip diverting tarps, think again. Truck drivers are known for doing all sorts of ingenious things with limited resources. There is a lot they can do with a drip diverter.

For example, you might have a truck driver who likes to sit outside his rig at the end of a long day. A drip diverter makes a perfect canopy so that he’s not stuck inside the cab if it’s raining. That same drip diverter can be used as a temporary solution if the sleeper cab springs a leak in the middle of a trip. It will do the trick until the driver can get his rig in for repair.

We have seen truck drivers use their drip diverters as impromptu sun blockers as well. In the right position, a folded drip diverter can block portions of the side window, thus keeping the sun at bay without affecting the driver’s ability to view side mirrors.

The All-Purpose Tarp

Most of the customers we sell drip diverters to are farmers and truck drivers. But really, this is an all-purpose tarp that has plenty of uses beyond what has been described here. RV owners use drip diverters to keep rain off their picnic tables and grills. They use them to cover their gas tanks during travel.

At home, drip converters can be used in the garage the same way a farmer would use one in the barn. In short, drip diverters are a temporary solution to a big problem. By catching water and the diverting it away from sensitive areas, a drip-diverting tarp can save you a ton of money and a lot of hard work by preventing a minor leak from becoming a major disaster.

We invite you to check out our inventory of drip diverters. We offer three sizes: 10′ x 10′, 7′ x 7′, and 5′ x 5′. Each one is constructed with vinyl-coated material and heavy-duty grommets in the corners.


Fence Installation: Getting It Right More Important than Speed

A father and son from New Zealand recently competed in a fence installation contest that resulted in the younger competitor beating the older. Apparently, the competition is an annual event at the National Agricultural Fieldays in Hamilton, New Zealand. And while speed may be important to winning the Golden Pliers competition, getting it right is more important in a real-world setting.

Here at Mytee Products, we sell a complete inventory of fencing materials including energizers and wire rope. We are careful to encourage customers who visit our Ohio showroom to take their time and do things right. Getting it right is more important than speed when you are installing a fence designed to keep your cattle in.

The Student Becomes the Master

Getting back to the New Zealand competition for just a minute, 47-year-old Shane Bouskill apparently decided to retire from competition after being beaten by his son Tony. The younger Bouskill, just 28 years old, won the competition in grand fashion. He brought an end to his father’s four-year reign as champion.

Tony’s father was already planning to retire even before this year’s competition got underway. But he convinced his father to give it one more shot. Shane Bouskill ultimately finished fourth. The two teamed up in a separate pairs competition which they won for the second straight year.

A day after the competition, Tony was back to work installing fences for customers. He said he’s not sure if his father will retire only from competition or from fence building entirely. In either case, father and son do very well for themselves building fences for farmers, cattle ranchers, and anyone else who needs them.

Building a Fence the Right Way

Fence building competitions aside, there are right and wrong ways to install electrified fencing. A property owner going electrified rather than barbed wire has a few considerations to think of. For example, the chosen energizer for any given fence has to be proportional to the amount of fence being powered. Attempting to power too much line with an inadequate energizer results in ineffective fencing.

Other things to consider include:

” The Number of Posts – Electrified fences do not require as many posts as barbed wire because the tension on the wire rope is not nearly as high. But that does not mean property owners can skimp. They still need the right number of posts correctly positioned in the ground.

” System Grounding – Electrified fencing needs to be properly grounded in order to function. It is not uncommon for inexperienced property owners to damage their systems due to improper grounding.

” Number of Lines – Electrified fencing doesn’t require as many lines as its barbed wire counterpart. Still, a fence cannot have any big gaps between lines if it’s going to be as effective as possible. Three to four lines is generally recommended.

” Backup Power – The one downside to electrified fencing is that electricity can be knocked out in a storm. It is wise to design a fence with backup power in mind. Whether that means a solar-powered energizer, battery backup, or running a generator during power outages is less important than actually coming up with a workable solution.

It is great that the Bouskills can install electrified fencing in record time. But once the annual competition in New Zealand is over, father and son go back to work with a focus on doing things right. If you have to choose between speed and a by-the-book installation, always go with the latter. Getting it right is always more important than doing it quickly.