More from: tractor tire

Ag Tire Life Is Ultimately About Air Pressure

Tractor and wagon tires take an awful lot of punishment on the farm. They are some of the toughest pieces of equipment farmers own. Surprisingly though, the most important factor determining tire life is not the work tires do or the conditions they are subject to. No, ag tire life is ultimately about air pressure.

Rubber casings and steel belts obviously play a significant role in tractor and wagon tire performance. But casings and belts are really just a house for air. It is the air inside the tires that supports the weight of a tractor or wagon. It is the air that gives an otherwise soft tire its solid structure. Maintaining correct tire pressure maximizes life; not maintaining pressure reduces life. It is all pretty simple.

Tire Pressure During Winter

Your average tractor owner knows enough to check tire pressure during the spring, summer, and fall. After all, the owner is using the tractor just about every day. It is winter that causes the most problems for tire pressure. Tractors and wagons put in storage can be forgotten until the snow melts and the ice thaws. That’s a mistake.

A good rule of thumb is to check tractor and wagon tires at least twice a week over the winter. Note that temperature plays a crucial role in tire pressure. As temperatures fall, so does tire pressure. It goes back up as the temperature rises. What does this tell you? It tells you that prolonged periods of sustained cold could make your tires soft enough to affect both tread and sidewall. Air should be added when temperatures begin to rise.

It is interesting that tractor tires do not hold a lot of air to begin with. Anywhere from 20 to 35 pounds is normal. In terms of cold temperatures though, tractor tires tend to lose a pound of pressure per square inch for every 10° the temperature falls. The time of biggest concern is that the point of the first cold snap of the season.

Liquid Filled Tires

There are times when tractor and wagon owners decide to fill their tires with fluid to keep them in better shape for the winter. That’s not a bad idea for preserving sidewalls and maintaining a good footprint. Yet tires should never be filled with water. Water expands when it freezes, which could be hazardous for tractor and wagon tires.

Experts recommend being very careful when buying used tires from warm weather climates. Let’s say you are buying tires from Florida or Southern California, where freezing is near impossible. The seller you are purchasing from may have filled tires with water, not even thinking about it. One hard freeze on your property in Ohio could mean big problems.

We Recommend New Tires

Here at Mytee Products, we understand that circumstances sometimes dictate purchasing used tires. We recommend buying new whenever possible. New tires are going to offer many more years of reliable service as long as they are taken care of. You never know how long used tires will last.

You might already be making plans to put your tractor and wagons away for the winter. In a couple of more weeks, you’ll be ready to set aside working in the field in favor of getting some of that back-office work done. Just remember that your tractor and wagon tires need to be maintained over the winter. Check air pressure at least twice a week. And if you are going to use liquid to fill your tires, make sure you use something that won’t freeze.


Tractor Tires Are Tough, But Stalks Are Tougher

As suppliers of  agricultural experts here at Mytee Products. So imagine our surprise to learn that while tractor tires are fairly tough, grain stalks are even tougher. Some of the toughest stalks can ruin a brand-new set of tires in 100 hours or less if a grower isn’t careful. Of course, there are things tractor owners can do to mitigate the damage.

According to Ag Web, some of the worst stalks for tractor tires include soybean, wheat, corn, canola, and even cotton. The problem is that running a combine through a field often leaves behind cut stalks with razor-sharp edges that can easily penetrate rubber. If a combine leaves the stalks standing straight up as it passes through, you are looking at a field of spikes sticking up, just waiting to puncture tractor tires.

Ag Web stated back in 2009 that tire manufacturers were working on harder rubber compounds that could better withstand the punishment of the field. We know that to be true as a tractor tire dealer. Today’s tires are better than anything the industry has seen in the past. Nonetheless, there is no such thing as a perfect tractor tire impervious to sharp grain stalks.

Tips for Preserving Your Truck Tires

Every purchase of tractor tires is a cost that goes against the grower’s bottom line. It doesn’t make sense to have to buy new tires every season just for lack of taking care of the tires you purchased the season before. Just a few simple tips can help extend the life of your tractor tires considerably.

1. Modify Your Combine

One of the easiest thing growers can do is modify their combines so that sharp stalks are not left sticking up. Stubble shoes mounted on the combine accomplish this by pushing stalks forward slightly. Rather than being left sticking straight up, the combine leaves them pointed forward at about 45 degrees. They will do little damage to tractor tires as long as the grower doesn’t come back later and drive against the grain.

A stalk stomper is another option. This is a homemade implement consisting of a heavy pipe mounted in front of the rear tires to knock down stocks before the tires pass over.

2. Install New Tires Early

Tractor tires are similar to other tires in that they need time to season. That is to say they need time to ‘toughen up’. If you are buying new tires, install them as early as possible. Give them all spring and summer to toughen up before harvest arrives. They will do much better in the field after a few months on the tractor.

3. Run Between Rows

Growers can also increase tire life by running the tires between rows. This would seem to be common sense. Running between rows minimizes tire exposure and reduces the risk of puncture. If you do have to run across a row, go either perpendicular to it or in the same direction the stalks are leaning. The idea is to minimize contact between tires and razor-sharp edges.

No tractor tire will last forever. But if you make the effort to be careful with the tires you have, they will last longer. So respect the fact that some of the stalks you leave in your field can be pretty brutal on your tires.

If you are in the market for new tractor tires, we hope you’ll check out our inventory. And don’t hesitate to contact us even if you do not see what you need. We still might have a way to get it for you.

 


Tips for Extending Tractor Tire Life

There is a lot of information online about maintaining car and tractor-trailer tires. There is not a lot out there for agriculture tires. And yet, farmers do not want to spend any more on tractor and wagon tires than truckers want to spend to outfit their rigs. So knowing how to extend wagon and tractor tire life is important to farmers.

You can purchase tractor tires from Mytee Products for less than $200 apiece. Farmers can spend thousands of dollars per tire for the biggest, baddest tires built for monster agriculture machines. Either way you look at it, tires take a bite out of the farmer’s income. Why spend more than you have to when doing a few simple things can add years to the life of your tractor tires?

Become an Expert at Tire Pressure

Tire pressure is the most critical element in extending the life of wagon and tractor tires. Unlike tires for passenger vehicles and tractor trailers, agriculture tires should be inflated and deflated according to how they are being used. That’s why these tires have both low and high-end air pressure recommendations. Consider the following:

In the Field – It is generally recommended that you deflate tractor tires to the lowest recommended PSI when working in the field. This offers maximum traction and less tire compaction.

Working on Slopes – The stress put on tires increases considerably when a tractor is working on a slope. This kind of work generally requires inflating tires to the upper end of PSI recommendations. Some manufacturers even recommend exceeding maximum PSI by a few pounds for slope work.

Over The Road Transport – Transporting agricultural equipment over-the-road puts extra stress on tires that are not really designed to withstand this kind of punishment for prolonged periods. The general rule is to maximize air pressure for over-the-road travel.

It can be a hassle to continually adjust tire pressure on your tractor or wagon. But it is well worth the effort once you realize how proper inflation can extend the life of your tires.

Become an Expert at Tire Ballast

Adding tire ballast can be quite helpful for field work. Ballast adds extra down force that gives tires traction. But like inflation, ballast has to be properly managed. You want enough ballast in the field to prevent slippage, but then you want to remove that ballast once the work is done.

Always Match Your Tires

Extending the life of wagon and tractor tires is made a lot easier by correctly matching tires across a single vehicle. In other words, do not mix radial and biased tires. Do not use tires of different sizes just to avoid a purchase. Make sure all your tires match. And if you are using bias and radial tires in a dual situation, put the radials on the inside.

Storage in the Off-Season

The off-season is when a lot of unnecessary and unnoticed damage is done to tires. As you prepare your tractor for winter storage, jack it up and put it on blocks. Then remove the wheels and reduce tire pressure by 10 PSI or so. Store the tires standing upright on the tread. Do not lay them down flat.

Mytee Products has a selection of wagon and tractor tires for agricultural operations. We invite you to take a look to see if we have what you need. And whatever you do, get more bang for your tire-buying buck by following the recommendations we have included in this post. Extending the life of your wagon and tractor tires will make your Mytee purchase even more valuable.


Good Truck Tires: More than Just a Brand

Your tractor is equipped with 10 of them. Every time you drive, you sit on a platform mounted directly over them, trusting they will get you where you need to go. We are obviously talking about tractor tires. What may seem insignificant to people who do not drive a truck for a living are objects that are incredibly important to you. Good truck tires can be lifesavers.

It is with that knowledge that a quick perusal of tire discussions on trucker forums becomes a fascinating endeavor in anthropology. It can be quite entertaining to read comments left by trucker’s arguing over who makes the best and worst tires. One guy will swear by Yokohama while another prefers Goodyear and so on.

Still other truck drivers argue over whether to buy cheap tires more often or expensive tires less often. At the end of the day, it all boils down to choosing the tire that gets the job done safely. Unfortunately, though, there is no black and white rule for saying one brand of tire is better than another.

It’s All about Traction

Peeling away the manufacturer claims and dealer promotions reveals that tire safety is really all about traction. Isn’t that why you put deep tread tires on your tractor anyway? Of course. You are depending on those treads to channel away water, snow and ice, and debris that could throw off the handling of your truck. You are expecting that tread to give you the traction you need to get going from a full stop on a slick road.

Manufacturers and dealers are fully aware of how important tread is to tire sales. As such, they make a lot of noise about tread depth and pattern. Deeper treads essentially mean longer-lasting tires while specific tread patterns are more advantageous under certain weather conditions. But note that traction and safety do not stop there.

There is television programs which  feature truck drivers who make their living on the icy roads of Alaska and northern Canada. If you’ve ever watched the show, you may have observed drivers reducing the air pressure in their tractor tires. They do this for a reason.

Lower air pressures increase the amount of tire surface that comes in contact with the road. Under icy conditions, this affords extra traction that could be a lifesaver in an emergency. Of course, you wouldn’t want to drive on dry pavement with low tire pressure but running a rig on an icy road is another matter.

Your Driving Habits Matter

Another thing that is frequently lost in the discussion over which tires are best is the reality that driving habits matter. How fast a trucker accelerates and brakes partly determines how quickly his tires wear. The same is true for cornering and backing. Tractor tires are under a tremendous amount of stress even when the driver drives perfectly. But how many drivers do that all the time? Very few.

How a driver drives also affects the rest of the rig in ways that indirectly affect tire wear. That previously mentioned TV program featured a driver in its first season who was extremely reckless with his equipment. The way this guy ran his rig had him spending more time in the repair shop than on the road. The damage he caused would have undoubtedly affected tire wear had it not been repaired.

Tractor tires are indeed lifesavers. When you choose new tires for your truck, consider more than just the brand. There is more to tire safety than a mere name emblazoned on the sidewall.


5 Things Cattle Ranchers Can Buy from Us

Here at Mytee Products, we are not normally known as a supplier of the kinds of products cattle ranchers need to keep their operations going. We certainly are no complete tractor supply store by any means, but we do carry a number of products that we know are important to ranchers. In this post, you will learn about five such products.

Rest assured you can always contact us if you have questions about the things you see on our website. We are as committed to our agricultural customer as we are the trucking industry. Anything we can do to support your operation, within the scope of our own business model, is worth doing.

1. Hay Tarps

Tarps are really what started it all for Mytee Products. But our inventory is not restricted only to truck tarps. We also carry hay tarps perfect for agricultural operations. Cattle ranchers use them to cover their hay during the late autumn and winter seasons, knowing how much damage moisture and bad weather can do to their feed.

We carry hay tarps for as low as $125 apiece. Ranchers can also purchase spiral anchor pins to go along with their tarps. Hay tarps are the next best thing for protecting hay in the absence of a barn or some other kind of permanent structure. And that leads us to our next item.

2. Temporary Storage Buildings

Our durable and high-quality portable storage buildings make great structures for a multitude of purposes. Ranchers can use them to store hay, cover equipment, or even as a portable pen to keep cattle out of the weather. Our inventory includes several assorted sizes and configurations to meet a variety of needs.

The smallest is an 8′ x 12′ storage shed, while the largest is a whopping 30′ x 65′ unit specifically designed for hay storage. Each of the units is easy to set up and take down with a minimal amount of effort and hand tools required.

3. Moisture Testers

As long as we are talking about protecting hay, let’s talk moisture testers. A good moisture tester could mean the difference between preserving a crop of hay and watching it go bad due to excess moisture. It is critical that cattle ranchers pay attention to their hay throughout the winter months if they expect to have enough feed to make it through until spring. A good moisture tester is part of that effort. Fortunately, we now have nearly a dozen models for our customers to choose from.

4. Fencing Material and Energizers

Keeping cattle inside designated areas is the job of electrified fencing. Yes, you can purchase fencing material and energizers directly from Mytee Products. We carry both wire and energizers for easy configuration of any size fence. Moreover, we have two different solar-powered energizers for those areas where mains power is not available.

5. Wagon and Tractor Tires

Just because cattle ranchers are raising crops does not mean they don’t use tractors and wagons, so we are here with a good selection of tires to keep their vehicles going. All our tires come from manufacturers that farmers have come to know and trust, including Carlisle and BKT.

Mytee Products may be known more for the trucking and towing-related products we stock, but we are equally committed to supporting the agricultural industry as much as we can. If you are a cattle rancher, we hope you will consider us as your main supplier of the items listed above. We hope to be able to expand our inventory in the future to better serve your needs.