More from: rv covers

Why Smart RV Owners Cover Their Rigs

RV and trailer owners are under no legal mandate to cover their rigs during the off-season. There aren’t any standard manufacturer recommendations, either. Yet Mytee Products has no problem selling RV and trailer covers year-round. The more covers we stock, the more we seem to sell.

There is a reason that Smart RV owners cover their rigs during the off-season. In fact, there are five reasons. Each one is explained below. If you own an RV or camping trailer that is not normally covered over the winter, you might want to reconsider your storage strategy.

1. UV Rays Aren’t Good for RVs

You already know that UV rays are not good for your eyes, right? Well, they aren’t good for your RV either. Constant exposure to UV rays can break down the seals around windows, doors, air conditioning units, etc. That could mean leaks that lead to quite a bit of interior damage.

UV rays aren’t a problem when you cover your rig. Whether you live in a climate that still sees plenty of sun during the winter or you are confined to a colder, more overcast environment, a cover keeps damaging UV rays out.

2. High Interior Temperatures Aren’t Good

Allowing the interior temperature of your RV or trailer to get too high isn’t good for its internal components. High temperatures can slowly degrade cabinetry, plumbing, and even electronics. You ideally want to keep internal temperatures at 80° or less whenever possible. Covering your rig during the off-season does the trick.

3. Water on the Roof Can Cause Problems

One of the biggest problems that RV and trailer owners face during the off-season is the accumulation of snow, ice, and water. This is generally not a problem during the season because travel takes care of any accumulated water. But during the off-season, there could be problems.

A cover keeps water from accumulating directly on the roof surface. In so doing, it prevents backups that could lead to leaks around vents and A/C units. The more water you can keep off the roof during the off-season, the better off your rig will be.

4. Finishes and Graphics Fade

The finish and graphics on any RV or trailer will gradually fade over time. But there’s no need to accelerate the process by leaving your rig unprotected in the off-season. Throw a good quality RV or trailer cover on your rig and you’ll notice your finish and graphics don’t fade nearly as fast. That will help maintain the rig’s resale value as well.

5. Dirt and Debris Can Stain

Have you ever seen older RVs and trailers with obvious black streaks and splotches? Those are likely stains left by mother nature. All sorts of dirt and debris she deposits on your rig can break down and leave stains in its wake. From decomposing leaves to dead insects, there are lots of things in nature that could leave their mark behind.

Once again, an RV or trailer cover is the solution. Let your cover get stained and streaked rather than your rig. You are going to fold up and store it away during the season anyway. Better that your cover should look ugly than your rig.

Remember that a proper fit is key to using an RV or trailer cover to its maximum potential. Mytee Products offers a variety of sizes for most standard RVs and trailers. So be sure to check sizes as you shop. If you cannot find something appropriate to your RV or trailer, please contact us and let us know. There’s a good chance we can locate what you need.


Tips for Using RV and Trailer Covers

Now that the autumn season is upon us, RV and travel trailer owners are putting their vehicles away for the winter. Many of them will use an RV or trailer cover to protect their units from the weather. There are pros and cons to this strategy, as evidenced by the fair amount of disagreement that exists among RV and trailer owners. We will let you decide whether it’s the right strategy for you or not.

With that said, we do have some helpful tips should you decide to cover your RV or trailer with a winter cover. The tips are designed to make sure your cover does not damage your vehicle during the winter months. We want you to be able to uncover and go next spring without any problems.

1. Properly Secure Your Cover

Make sure to properly secure your cover with bungee cords or ropes. You do not want any portion of the cover to be loose enough to flap in the wind. Any flapping can cause cosmetic damage to the outside of your vehicle by way of grommets striking the surface. Continual striking can even loosen the grommets.

2. Create a Crown

It is a good idea to create a slight crown across the top of your vehicle so that the cover is not laying flat on the roof. Modern vehicles have air-conditioning units that make this task easier. You can also use things such as foam blocks and winter swimming pool inflatables to create the crown. The point is to create a surface that will allow precipitation and leaves to run off the top rather than collecting on the roof of your vehicle.

3. Check Cover Condition

Unless you are using a brand-new cover right out-of-the-box, it is a good idea to inspect your cover before putting it on. You are looking primarily for holes that can allow moisture in. The problem with moisture is that if it becomes trapped under the cover, it could cause a number of problems. Caulking could become moldy, aluminum parts could start to rust, and so on. You want the surface underneath to remain completely free of moisture throughout the winter months.

4. Beware of Abrasion

RV and trailer covers will not usually suffer rips and tears under normal conditions. The enemy of these covers is abrasion. You can get the most life out of your cover by reducing exposure to abrasive surfaces such as mirrors (fold them in), antennas (retract them), and roof vents (close them). If there are any potentially abrasive surfaces around windows or doors, you can reduce the friction by using foam padding or electrical tape.

Ordering a new RV or trailer cover is a matter of getting the right size. Although you do not want a cover that is excessively large, having one that is slightly too big is definitely better than purchasing one that is too small. The good news is that covers come in standard sizes. You just need to measure the length, width, and height of your unit to know what to order.

For RVs, measure the length from tail to nose and the height from the roofline down to the bottom of the chassis. Do not measure down to the ground. Also, there is no need to account for air-conditioning units. Manufacturers already take them into consideration when designing their covers.

For trailers, measure the height the same way. For length, there is no need to account for the tongue. You only need to measure the actual size of the trailer shell. Width measurements are pretty straightforward regardless of the RV or trailer unit you have.