More from: coil tarps

5 Questions to Ask Before Buying Tarps

In just a few short weeks, we at Mytee Products will begin seeing an influx of truck drivers coming in to stock up on tarps in preparation for the winter. Many of our customers have been driving trucks long enough to know exactly what they need. Others, might not be so sure of what they need to buy – especially if this is their first winter on the road.

We believe the best way to assemble a collection of tarps is to ask the five questions posed below. These questions help truck drivers better understand what they need, covering everything from standard steel to canvas tarps.

1. How do different tarps vary?

We carry a range of vinyl and canvas tarps in different shapes and sizes. We don’t do so simply because we like variety. It turns out that each kind of tarp has its own unique purpose. As for vinyl and canvas, the two materials have their strengths and weaknesses.

New drivers should do a little research to learn about coil, steel, lumber, smoke, and machinery tarps. They should also educate themselves on the difference between vinyl and canvas. Once a driver knows all the differences, he or she can evaluate what is necessary to get through winter.

2. Which tarps best suit my needs?

Driver needs are as varying as the loads they carry. A driver who earns most of his or her living carrying loads of steel coil will probably invest mainly in those two kinds of tarps. Another driver who concentrates mainly on lumber will invest heavily in lumber tarps. Most drivers don’t have the luxury of focusing on a particular type of cargo, though. Therefore, they have to carry a selection of different tarps on board.

3. How will a particular tarp perform?

There is always the question of how a particular tarp might perform if used to cover cargo for which it was not originally intended. For example, consider a driver who focuses mainly on lumber. If he were to accept one or two machinery loads every year, would those lumber tarps in the toolbox still perform well? The idea here is that while a variety of tarps are usually recommended, a driver does not need to invest unnecessarily if some of the tarps in the box can be multi-functional.

4. What sizes do I need?

Truck tarps come in a variety of sizes to accommodate different loads. We know drivers who purchase only the smallest tarps because these are the easiest to use. They would rather deploy multiple smaller tarps then wrestle with bigger ones. But that’s all driver preference. If you want to invest in tarps of multiple sizes, purchase an equal number of all.

5. Do I know how to care for tarps?

Last but not least is the pesky question of caring for truck tarps. Although truck tarps are generally not high maintenance items, they do require a certain amount and type of care if a trucker wants to get maximum life out of each purchase. It should be noted that caring for canvas tarps is different than caring for vinyl tarps. There are also different ways to repair tarps depending on the material used.

Autumn is the season when we see a lot of truck drivers stocking up on their tarps ahead of winter. If you need to bolster your inventory, Mytee Products has everything you need. From vinyl steel tarps to heavy duty canvas tarps, you will find everything you need to complete your inventory here. Feel free to order online or, if you’re ever in the neighborhood, visit our Ohio warehouse.


The Magic Is In The Stitching

When you take a look at any of the tarps we stock, you will notice double-stitched seams and heavy-duty box stitching. An average driver will assume these stitches are for added strength, which to an extent is true, however few are familiar with the physics behind it. One should be careful when purchasing truck tarps, be it lumber, steel or coil tarps that haven’t been manufactured using these kind of stitches.

A truck driver needs tarps to protect cargo from the weather and road debris. However, he/she also requires durable tarps that withstand the wear and tear of daily driving for as long as can be. That is why we recommend spending a little more on a high-quality tarp that offers years of reliable service. Opting for a cheaper alternative could end up costing more in the long run as the tarps might need to be replaced more often.

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Spreading the Load Evenly

The idea behind double stitched seams is one of spreading the load across a larger piece of fabric for added strength. By ‘spreading the load’ we mean taking the stress created by pressure (in this case, the pressure generated by both the cargo and the straps used to secure the tarp) and spreading it across the entire seam rather than just concentrating it at the point of a D-ring or grommet.

The laws of physics dictate that the immediate surface area around a pressure point carries the most amount of stress at any given time. Nevertheless, threads running through the fabric of a tarp take some of that stress and distribute the energy across a larger area. It stands to reason that greater stress distribution is achieved by using more thread. That is precisely the point of double stitched seams.

The double stitched seam increases the amount of thread and fabric used to absorb the energy placed on high stress points. Instead of one small piece of fabric and a grommet carrying all the energy of a tie down strap, the energy is dispersed and the overall stress reduced.

The Box Stitch

The box stitch is used to secure D-rings based on the same principle. The only difference here is that the load is not being spread across a greater amount of the tarp surface. Rather, it is being evenly distributed within the webbing that holds a D-ring in place. If you are not sure what we are talking about, look at one of your lumber tarps next time you are tying one down.

A D-ring is held in place by a piece of heavy-duty nylon webbing. If that webbing were stitched in place around the outside edges only, all of the stress put on the D-ring would be absorbed by the edge seam and the small amount of fabric it is attached to. Box stitching distributes the stress across the entire piece of webbing to hold it more firmly in place. Having said that, using the box pattern is important.

A box stitch essentially divides the webbing into smaller pieces that each carries its portion of the load. Even if one part fails, there are up to a dozen others capable of absorbing the energy. A properly stitched webbing is one that could last almost forever under the right conditions.

As you can see, designing and manufacturing lumber, steel and coil tarps requires more than just cutting a piece of nylon to size and putting a nice, cosmetic stitch in place. Tarp designers put a lot of work into the physics of the matter, making sure that stress does not pull a tarp apart, literally at the seams. A well-designed tarp is one that provides cargo protection and stands up to the stresses of flatbed trucking.


Smartly Tarping Your Cargo To a Great Truck Driving Career

America’s over the road truck drivers have three primary kinds of work to choose from: refrigerated (refer) hauling, dry van hauling, and flatbed hauling. Few drivers would argue that sometimes flatbed truckers have the most challenging of roles to fulfill. The primary reasons arises when drivers have to drive in extreme weather conditions and gauge what changes in climate at their point of destination. The secondary reason could be that an inexperienced driver would not be knowledgeable enough to utilize his tarping gear to secure the cargo and have a safe trip.

What does flatbed driving appear to be such a difficult task? The answer to this is – load securing is key to a drivers track record and the company’s reputation in protecting their customers cargo. Drivers are responsible for the security of their loads from the moment they drive out of the shipping yard to the moment the receiver unloads the cargo. Not only do they have to ensure cargo remains securely on board, they also have to take the necessary steps to prevent damage along the way. And in most cases, that means applying tarps both, efficiently and effectively. Considering the following tarps allows a driver to determine which ones are best suited to protect their load:

tarping

Steel Tarps – steel tarps are the most commonly used in flatbed trucking. They are quite large and generally flat and rectangle so that they can be used to cover virtually any cargo. The average flatbed trucker will own several of these, all stored in a utility box or a rack behind the cab.

Coil Tarps – coil tarps are smaller tarps designed primarily to cover loads of coil, cabling or other similar products. A good coil tarp is dome-shaped in order to accommodate the coils with a tight fit that reduces drag and flapping.

Lumber Tarps – lumber tarps can be a bit more challenging to apply as they are the heaviest and due to their side and back flaps. Lumber tarps are designed in this way to protect an entire load from top to bottom.

Smoke Tarps – The smallest in tarp family are smoke tarps. These are used at the front of the load when the load requires protection from exhaust. As they are smaller, these can be applied quickly and easily.

Based on these four choices, that the means of covering a load are not universal. A driver must assess each load to determine the best way to protect it. Then comes the crucial process of applying and securing tarps.

The Smart Flatbed Driver

For drivers to do a good job of securing tarp over their cargo, one must consider the profile of the driver.Those who choose flatbed driving as a career have the ability to think of solutions to a problem ( weather, load size etc) and also have the physical disposition to haul an average tarp that generally weighs between 50-100lbs.

It is due to these factors that Flatbed truck drivers get paid handsomely compared to their counterparts in other sectors of the trucking driving industry. Better pay also results in a better retention rate, so understanding tarps and efficiently using them can result in a long term flatbed trucking career