Hay Tarps Protect Your Hay – From Cows

Just about every farmer in the U.S. who deals with hay has a collection of hay tarps or some other means of protecting the crop that was harvested. More often than not, tarps are used to keep hay out of the rain so as to prevent mold and mildew, insect infestation, and spontaneous combustion. But there appears to be another very good reason for using tarps: protecting the hay from cows.

A recent video out of Washington state gave an intriguing look into what goes on in a typical pasture when a cattle rancher or farmer isn’t paying attention. The video shows several black cows enjoying their roll in a bale of hay down a hill. The important part here is that an entire bale was likely lost by the time the cows were done with it.

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All Downhill from There

An article accompanying the video published by the UK’s Daily Mail says that the incident occurred in Oak Harbor, Washington. Apparently, a group of cows were out grazing in the pasture when one of them, nudged a standing bale of hay with her nose. It began rolling, inviting the cow to nudge it again. Meanwhile, the other cows in the group started running and bucking. Once the hay bale gained some momentum, it was all downhill.

You can tell from the video that there is a slight incline that appears to be just enough to keep the bale moving. As it rolls downhill, the bale completely unravels – until there is nothing left. Meanwhile, the entire herd of cows participating in the party seem to be enjoying the experience. T

In the Field, at the Barn

While the video provides an adorable look at one aspect of a cow’s personality that most of us are not familiar with, there is also the technical and financial sides of the issue for farmers. It is common practice for hay to be bailed and left in the field for days or weeks until it can be collected and brought to the barn. Hay tarps are a tool for protecting any hay left in the field until it can be brought in.

Whether in the field or the barn, a good selection of tarps keeps hay dry. A good tarp might also have prevented the Washington cows from using their bale of hay as a plaything. To illustrate the point, consider the fact that farmers will stack three or four bales of hay together in the field before tarping them. The sheer size of the combined bales would prevent any cows in the pasture from being mischievous.

The key to tarping hay bales is to provide enough coverage to keep moisture off without limiting the ability of the bales underneath to breathe. That’s why you don’t see hay bales completely wrapped in tarp material. Tarps tend to go on top with a little bit draped over the sides just to keep any precipitation or condensation from soaking into the hay.

It is likely the cows in Washington more than enjoyed themselves rolling their hay bale down the hill. Given that cows are more intelligent than most of us know, it is also likely they might try to repeat it if given an opportunity to do so. Stacking several bales together and covering them with a hay tarp should prevent any such incidents from happening again.

Sources:

1. Daily Mail – http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3681986/While-farmer-s-away-cows-play-Group-excited-calves-fun-rolling-giant-HAY-BALE-hill.html


Good Insurance: As Important as Winch Straps

Mytee Products focuses on providing truck tarps, cargo protection supplies, tires, and other equipment to professional truck drivers. In light of what we sell, we don’t talk much about the other needs our customers might have. We want to change that with this blog post. Why? Because we recently added a new inventory of auto hauling supplies.

Delving into the auto hauling market has exposed us to some interesting information about this little talked about industry. For example, the winch straps and ratchets we sell are essential tools for auto haulers and brokers. But good insurance is just as important.

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The insurance that protects a car hauler is the only defense against liability claims. Like standard car insurance, business liability coverage for auto haulers and brokers offers various levels of protection and deductibles. The stronger the coverage, the less likely a hauler is to suffer a significant financial loss in the event of a liability claim.

Take Insurance Seriously

The best advice we can give car haulers and brokers is to take insurance seriously. When you shop with us for winch straps, ratchets, and other auto hauling supplies, you will undoubtedly take a good look at the quality of our products. You should do the same with your liability insurance.

How important is good insurance? Consider the following hypothetical scenario:

An auto carrier acting as a broker agrees to move a car from Miami to Houston. That carrier gives the actual contract to a local auto hauler that has been a trusted partner for years. The car is loaded and off it goes. The next day, the contractor calls to say there’s been an accident. It’s not a total loss, but the client’s car has been damaged pretty significantly. Who pays for that damage?

The contractor may insist he should not have to pay because he did everything he was supposed to do. He secured the tires with web straps; he anchored the car at four corners with axle straps; he made sure the load was centered and balanced. Making matters worse, his insurance company insists that the claim is the broker’s responsibility because the client entered a binding agreement with him, not the contractor.

In these kinds of scenarios, clients are left at the mercy of insurance companies who try to figure things out. As a car hauler or broker, you don’t want your customers to have to go through an arduous ordeal to settle a claim. It’s just bad for business. A good insurance policy from a reputable carrier will cover legitimate losses so that your customers do not suffer.

Protect Yourself and Your Business

At the end of the day, your liability insurance is every bit as important as your equipment. A good, sturdy trailer makes it possible for you to haul a client’s car safely without any worries about damage or wear and tear. A good supply of auto hauling straps and ratchets keep the car properly secured to your trailer for the entire journey. Everything is tied together with a solid insurance policy that protects you and your business in the unlikely event something goes wrong.

Our introduction into the car hauling industry has been very informative to date. We look forward to learning more about it as we seek to increase our inventory of auto hauling supplies. In the meantime, we invite you to browse the Mytee inventory for all of your cargo control and trucking needs. If we don’t have it, contact us anyway. We might still be able to get what you need for whatever your hauling.


How To Make Auto Hauling an Easier Task

There are some loads a truck driver might carry on the back of a trailer which seem relatively easy to handle however the reality is far from it. Cars are a perfect example.From a commercial car hauler to a pickup truck owner towing a trailer behind him, hauling cars is much more challenging than it looks. Drivers have to make sure that the cars not just secured but also well protected from any type of damage especially in severe weather conditions.

auto-hauler

Whether a driver hauls cars as a full-time job or does so only on weekends as a car hobbyist, there are certain conditions that can create hauling nightmares. We have listed three of them below along with information on using appropriate equipment like car hauling straps and winches, which can make all the difference in the world.

#1: Oversized Tires

Securing tires using webbing straps is not the norm for professional car haulers who use purpose-designed trailers. However, it is common practice for hobbyists. Securing the front or rear tires simply adds another layer of protection that keeps the vehicle more secure on the trailer. If you have oversized tires, though, they can present a real problem.

Oversized tires reduce stability, raise the center of gravity of the vehicle being hauled, and increase the likelihood of movement while en route. The obvious solution is oversized webbing straps with ratchets and swivel hooks that make it easy to apply just the right amount of force to keep tires in place. A side mount wheel net is an even better solution if you can find one in the right size.

#2: Oversized Frames

A vehicle built on an oversized frame presents an even bigger challenge than one with oversized tires. While there are obvious differences in scale, hauling a large 4×4 like a Jeep or Hummer can be as troublesome for a hobbyist as hauling a large payloader is for a professional.

For this kind of job, securing the tires is only a supplement. Drivers need to secure vehicles with oversized frames at the axles to keep them in place. Axle straps with rings are the right tool for such loads. Vehicles can be anchored at four points or, if required, even six or eight.

#3: Expensive Cars

The biggest nightmare for car haulers is moving expensive or classic cars across an open highway. These vehicles are, by their nature, supposed to be protected from any kind of damage. So now you’re talking about more than just winch straps and ratchets. You also have to consider any other dangers that might put the automobile at risk before you hit the road.

A hobbyist who owns a classic car needs to decide how much of a financial investment he wants to make to protect his car during transportation. However for a business owner who hauls classics on a daily basis, this is not an option. He or she is required maintain a full supply of straps, winches, tarps and any other supplies necessary for the different types of cars that need to be transported to ensure customer satisfaction.

Car hauling is unique in many different ways. From a cargo control standpoint, cars need to be anchored in place with the knowledge that they have moving parts that make them naturally susceptible to motion. Haulers must also be cognizant of how easily cars can be damaged if they are not secured properly.

If you are every short of auto hauling straps, Mytee offers a range of them to meet your requirements. Our inventory of car hauling equipment consists of webbing straps, ratchet straps, chain anchor delta rings along with different types of hooks and pads.


Important Safety Tips for Auto Hauling

Economic indicators suggest that the remainder of 2016 could be relatively strong for the auto hauling sector. The biggest beneficiaries of the strong market will not be new car carriers; they will be smaller companies hauling used cars for wholesalers and individual car owners moving out of state. This suggests that new businesses could emerge in the sector.

If you are new to auto hauling, you may lack the necessary experience to have a competitive edge at the early stages of your operation. However consistently learning tricks about cargo control and ensuring cargo safely delivered will help grow your business. At the forefront of everything you do should be one word: safety. The safety of your customers’ vehicles and your workers comes before anything else. In light of that, we have put together a collection of safety tips compiled from various experts in the industry.

tirestraps

Know Your Equipment

Before you ever haul your first car, you need to be familiar with all of your equipment. That includes trailers, auto hauling straps, trailer winches, ratchets, slider winches, ratcheting winches and anything others you might use on the job. Familiarize yourself with their operation as well as how to spot signs of wear and tear. You might even take some time to practice loading and unloading your own vehicle before you contract with a customer.

Always Be Better Prepared

When you do start taking jobs, remember that preparation is everything. Be sure you have the right straps and ratchets before heading to a customer’s location. Once you get there, clear the trailer bed so that your straps and ratchets are not in the way as you load. If you are using detachable ramps, be absolutely sure they are correctly positioned and locked in place before you start the load.

Always Level Your Trailer

An important part of preparation is making sure your auto trailer and the vehicle you plan to move are both on a level surface. Working on surfaces that are not level increases the risk of accidents significantly. Should conditions make it impossible to achieve a level state, chock the trailer tires prior to loading.

Just the Car, Please

Small companies that haul individual cars may find themselves in a position in which a client wants to fill the car with household goods before loading. It would pay to protect yourself from possibly libelous situations by insisting that you will be hauling the car itself. There is no point in accepting the increased liability that comes with extra cargo.

Also keep in mind that the towing capacity of your trailer is based on the weight of empty vehicles you might carry on it. Webbing straps and ratchets don’t add much weight, but household goods do. Make sure to inform customers of this situation so they realize your sense of responsibility.You won’t have a way of knowing whether the weight of your load is safe if you allow customers to pack their cars with household goods.

Follow Common Securing Procedures

There are different ways to secure vehicles to trailers depending on the kinds of straps and ratchets you are using. Be sure to research your equipment thoroughly so that you know how to use it following common security procedures that are used industry-wide. If you do not know what you’re doing, don’t guess. There are plenty of online resources complete with instructions and diagrams that can help you figure out the best cargo securing practices.

An independent car hauling business can be a very lucrative business for the enterprising individual willing to give it a go. Here at Mytee, we have a range of equipment and supplies designed to make your job easier. From straps to winches to ratchets, we are growing our inventory of auto hauling supplies for professionals and hobbyists alike.

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Understand the Physics Behind Beveled Lumber

Some of you might not consider it a worthwhile decision to purchase beveled lumber to secure your coil and pipe loads. We understand that however, at the same time, we know that beveled lumber is one of those things you do not realize the importance of, until, a piece of scrap woods fails at its job and the entire cargo is lost. High-quality beveled lumber made of hardwood is a lot like the wheel chock most car mechanics might use. It is seemingly insignificant, until it saves your life and your cargo.

Mytee recommends you purchase genuine beveled lumber rather than using scrap. To help explain why, we have put together a brief outline of the physics involved in blocking coil and pipe loads. We believe that once you know the physics, you will better understand the advantage of using hardwood beveled lumber over scrap.

beveled-lumber

It All Starts with Gravity

The need for some kind of block to hold piping or coil in place begins with the fundamental physical principle of gravity. Gravity is that which keeps a load firmly situated on the bed of your trailer. Where your load and the trailer meet, there is friction. The greater the friction, the more firmly the load will stay in place.

We run into problems with pipe and coil loads because of their circular shape. A circle making contact with a trailer bed creates less friction than a flat load. Why? Because there is less surface area in contact with the trailer. Less surface area means less friction; less friction means less grip. The friction between circular loads and flatbed trailers is so low that something else is needed to be placed to prevent the cargo from moving.

Creating an Opposite Force

Now that we understand how friction and gravity work together to keep a load in place, the second principle is that law of physics that says that for every existing force there is an equal and opposite force. This law is the whole reason behind using beveled lumber to block coil or pipe.

Picture a large piece of sewer pipe rolling across your trailer. Regardless of its direction from left to right, the rolling force of the pipe is always moving down. Therefore, stopping the pipe requires an equal or greater force moving upward. This is exactly what beveled lumber does. It provides an equal upward force to counteract the natural downward force gravity is applying to the pipe.

So why is beveled lumber better than scrap? It’s all in the bevel. Lumber with the beveled edge provides a larger surface area to make contact with the pipe above. Scrap lumber almost always has a square edge that provides less surface area for contact and friction. The less surface area, the less upward force the lumber applies.

Wood Quality Is Important

The last physics principle we need to understand is that of the distribution of force through the piece of lumber bearing the load. Too much force can cause lumber to crack or, in some cases, even shatter into small pieces. The beveled lumber you purchase from us is hardwood lumber; it is more than capable of handling all the force of a typical flatbed load. The same cannot be said for scrap lumber. There is a reason scrap lumber is scrap. Do you really want to trust it to hold up under the force of tons of pipe or coil?

Simple physics explains why beveled lumber is a better choice for blocking coil and pipe loads. And being that it is so inexpensive, we hope you will make a wiser choice. It’s obviously better to use hardwood beveled lumber made specifically for the purpose of cargo control.

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