Tips for Extending Tractor Tire Life

There is a lot of information online about maintaining car and tractor-trailer tires. There is not a lot out there for agriculture tires. And yet, farmers do not want to spend any more on tractor and wagon tires than truckers want to spend to outfit their rigs. So knowing how to extend wagon and tractor tire life is important to farmers.

You can purchase tractor tires from Mytee Products for less than $200 apiece. Farmers can spend thousands of dollars per tire for the biggest, baddest tires built for monster agriculture machines. Either way you look at it, tires take a bite out of the farmer’s income. Why spend more than you have to when doing a few simple things can add years to the life of your tractor tires?

Become an Expert at Tire Pressure

Tire pressure is the most critical element in extending the life of wagon and tractor tires. Unlike tires for passenger vehicles and tractor trailers, agriculture tires should be inflated and deflated according to how they are being used. That’s why these tires have both low and high-end air pressure recommendations. Consider the following:

In the Field – It is generally recommended that you deflate tractor tires to the lowest recommended PSI when working in the field. This offers maximum traction and less tire compaction.

Working on Slopes – The stress put on tires increases considerably when a tractor is working on a slope. This kind of work generally requires inflating tires to the upper end of PSI recommendations. Some manufacturers even recommend exceeding maximum PSI by a few pounds for slope work.

Over The Road Transport – Transporting agricultural equipment over-the-road puts extra stress on tires that are not really designed to withstand this kind of punishment for prolonged periods. The general rule is to maximize air pressure for over-the-road travel.

It can be a hassle to continually adjust tire pressure on your tractor or wagon. But it is well worth the effort once you realize how proper inflation can extend the life of your tires.

Become an Expert at Tire Ballast

Adding tire ballast can be quite helpful for field work. Ballast adds extra down force that gives tires traction. But like inflation, ballast has to be properly managed. You want enough ballast in the field to prevent slippage, but then you want to remove that ballast once the work is done.

Always Match Your Tires

Extending the life of wagon and tractor tires is made a lot easier by correctly matching tires across a single vehicle. In other words, do not mix radial and biased tires. Do not use tires of different sizes just to avoid a purchase. Make sure all your tires match. And if you are using bias and radial tires in a dual situation, put the radials on the inside.

Storage in the Off-Season

The off-season is when a lot of unnecessary and unnoticed damage is done to tires. As you prepare your tractor for winter storage, jack it up and put it on blocks. Then remove the wheels and reduce tire pressure by 10 PSI or so. Store the tires standing upright on the tread. Do not lay them down flat.

Mytee Products has a selection of wagon and tractor tires for agricultural operations. We invite you to take a look to see if we have what you need. And whatever you do, get more bang for your tire-buying buck by following the recommendations we have included in this post. Extending the life of your wagon and tractor tires will make your Mytee purchase even more valuable.


5 Things To Remember When Loading Ramps

We’ve all seen those epic fail videos online; videos showing people doing some pretty silly things. You don’t want to be included in that group when you are using trailer loading ramps. So learn how to use your ramps correctly. Otherwise, you could find yourself appearing in a viral video.

For the record, trailer loading ramps take advantage of a few key laws of physics that make it possible to get heavy loads up onto a trailer without having to use a lift boom. Those laws can be just as much your enemy as your friend. It pays to know how physics relates to the ramps you are using and the load they will carry.

Securing Ramps

The trailer ramps we sell are designed to be used with an aluminum skid seat and a locking rod. The reason here should be obvious: ramps need to be secured in place before any loading begins. Insecure ramps are almost guaranteed to fall away from the back of a trailer.

Before securing ramps, check to make sure the skid seat and locking rod are in good working condition. Any abnormalities that even look like they might compromise skid seat integrity should be dealt with before loading begins.

Loading at too Steep an Angle

The laws of physics dictate that less force is needed to move a load the lower the angle of ascent. As such, avoid the temptation of trying to load at too steep an angle. If the angle of load is too high for a particular job, either use longer ramps or find a higher surface you can use as an intermediate step in the loading process. If neither are possible, another method of loading will have to be considered.

Check Clearance

Clearance is a big issue when loading heavy equipment onto flatbed trailers. The clearance we are talking about is the clearance that exists between the bottom of the load and the top edge of the flatbed. A lack of sufficient clearance could mean a load gets stuck half-way on to the trailer, creating a potentially dangerous situation.

The way around clearance issues is to use ramps with arches built in. The arches lift the back of the load as it approaches the trailer, solving the problem of limited clearance.

Control Speed

Moving a load up a set of ramps too quickly is a dangerous proposition. Uncontrolled speed could cause a piece of heavy equipment to veer out of control once it reaches the flatbed. It could cause the equipment to jump, subsequently leading to damage on impact with the trailer.

There are just so many things that could go wrong here. So, whatever you do, make sure to control your speed when you’re using loading ramps to load heavy equipment. It is better to go too slow than too fast.

Always Ask for Loading Assistance

It is better to load ramps with assistance versus going solo. Flatbed drivers should always have the help of at least two other people who can keep an eye on the ramps from either side. If you can get two more to watch the trailer as well, that’s a bonus.

Trailer loading ramps are great tools for getting loads onto flatbeds. But they have to be used with caution and according to the laws of physics.


Good Truck Tires: More than Just a Brand

Your tractor is equipped with 10 of them. Every time you drive, you sit on a platform mounted directly over them, trusting they will get you where you need to go. We are obviously talking about tractor tires. What may seem insignificant to people who do not drive a truck for a living are objects that are incredibly important to you. Good truck tires can be lifesavers.

It is with that knowledge that a quick perusal of tire discussions on trucker forums becomes a fascinating endeavor in anthropology. It can be quite entertaining to read comments left by trucker’s arguing over who makes the best and worst tires. One guy will swear by Yokohama while another prefers Goodyear and so on.

Still other truck drivers argue over whether to buy cheap tires more often or expensive tires less often. At the end of the day, it all boils down to choosing the tire that gets the job done safely. Unfortunately, though, there is no black and white rule for saying one brand of tire is better than another.

It’s All about Traction

Peeling away the manufacturer claims and dealer promotions reveals that tire safety is really all about traction. Isn’t that why you put deep tread tires on your tractor anyway? Of course. You are depending on those treads to channel away water, snow and ice, and debris that could throw off the handling of your truck. You are expecting that tread to give you the traction you need to get going from a full stop on a slick road.

Manufacturers and dealers are fully aware of how important tread is to tire sales. As such, they make a lot of noise about tread depth and pattern. Deeper treads essentially mean longer-lasting tires while specific tread patterns are more advantageous under certain weather conditions. But note that traction and safety do not stop there.

There is television programs which¬† feature truck drivers who make their living on the icy roads of Alaska and northern Canada. If you’ve ever watched the show, you may have observed drivers reducing the air pressure in their tractor tires. They do this for a reason.

Lower air pressures increase the amount of tire surface that comes in contact with the road. Under icy conditions, this affords extra traction that could be a lifesaver in an emergency. Of course, you wouldn’t want to drive on dry pavement with low tire pressure but running a rig on an icy road is another matter.

Your Driving Habits Matter

Another thing that is frequently lost in the discussion over which tires are best is the reality that driving habits matter. How fast a trucker accelerates and brakes partly determines how quickly his tires wear. The same is true for cornering and backing. Tractor tires are under a tremendous amount of stress even when the driver drives perfectly. But how many drivers do that all the time? Very few.

How a driver drives also affects the rest of the rig in ways that indirectly affect tire wear. That previously mentioned TV program featured a driver in its first season who was extremely reckless with his equipment. The way this guy ran his rig had him spending more time in the repair shop than on the road. The damage he caused would have undoubtedly affected tire wear had it not been repaired.

Tractor tires are indeed lifesavers. When you choose new tires for your truck, consider more than just the brand. There is more to tire safety than a mere name emblazoned on the sidewall.


Reasons for Using Battery or Solar-Powered Fence Energizers

Farmers looking to install electrified fencing tend to choose energizers that either plug into outlets or are hardwired to an existing electrical system. Nonetheless, Mytee Products sells both battery- and solar-powered energizers for a variety of uses. You may wonder why. If so, you are not alone.

Both battery and solar-powered fence energizers have their uses. They are not likely to be a long-term solution for a large amount of acreage, however they can be rather handy in some situations. Below are a few reasons farmers would purchase these energizers. After reading through, it would be hard not to consider buying them.

Frequent Power Outages

You may be a farmer that lives in a rural area subject to severe weather throughout the late spring and early summer. On any given day, a storm could blow through and knock out the power for hours. What if all your energizers require mains power? Your electric fencing could be down for quite a while.

A battery-powered energizer is the obvious answer in these kinds of situations. Just disconnect the standard energizer, connect the battery-powered unit, and let it go until electricity is restored. Then go make the swap back and you are all set. The battery-powered energizer can be put on the shelf until the next power outage.

Utilizing Temporary Pastures

A lot of our customers who choose solar-powered energizers do so because they make use of temporary pastures. These are generally smaller operations or hobby farms where animals are frequently moved from one temporary pasture to the next.

Because there is no need to keep all the fencing electrified around-the-clock, a good way to save money and alleviate dependence on grid power is to use solar energizers. A good solar energizer is just as functional even if cloudy skies are prevalent from time to time. The energizer can be hooked to the fencing where needed, and then unhooked and moved to the next temporary pasture in the rotation.

Installing New Fences

Yet another reason for using battery-powered or solar energizers is to get a new electrified fence up and running while you are waiting on power to be run out to that location. In other words, farmers can install new fencing more quickly by having an alternate means of energizing on hand. They do not have to wait until electric lines are run and outlets installed. They just hook up and go.

Getting off the Grid

Believe it or not, we have worked with customers running hobby farms who are doing everything they can to get off the grid. They might use a turbine for their electricity coupled with a solar system on the roof. Out in the field, they want to contain their animals behind electrified fencing powered with solar energizers.

Getting off the grid is a perfectly legitimate way of doing things. We are just happy we can help meet the need with a selection of solar-powered energizers that are perfect for hobby farms. And even if these kinds of energizers cannot make a farm completely independent of grid power, they sure can supplement quite nicely.

Mytee Products is grateful for the opportunity to provide supplies to farmers and ranchers. If you are a farmer using electrified fencing, we invite you to take a look at our inventory of energizers, fencing wire, and heavy rope. Also be sure to check out our hay tarps and moisture testers.

If we don’t have what you’re looking for, please do not hesitate to ask. We will do everything we can to get it.


Mytee Products Expanding Our Moisture Tester Line

If you have previously browsed our selection of agricultural products you’ve probably viewed our selection of hay moisture testers.We are proud to say that we have expanded our tester line to include moisture testers for both grain and coffee. We have added a few additional products to this category as well.

Our goal is to be one of the first suppliers you think of when you need agricultural products ranging from moisture testers to hay tarps and temporary storage buildings. So if you ever have need of something we do not carry, please contact us and let us know. We are always looking for new items that we can add to our agricultural products inventory. With all of that out of the way, let’s look at moisture testers.

Hay Testers

Moisture content is more critical for hay than most people realize. A person who has no knowledge of hay farming may drive down the country road and think nothing of the bales waiting in the field to be retrieved. To them, it is just grass compacted into a rectangular or circular shape. To the farmer though, those bales represent income.

Moisture can affect income by spoiling a crop. Farmers expect some amount of loss due to moisture, but they try to mitigate losses as much as possible. The moisture tester is an important part of that effort. Simply by inserting a rod into a bale of hay, a farmer can instantly know whether the moisture content of that bale is too high or low. Then adjustments can be made accordingly.

Wise farmers routinely check moisture levels, at least several times during a given storage season. The more often, the better. We are thrilled to be able to give them a number of different moisture tester choices.

Grain Testers

Moisture level is just as important to grain growers, but for a different reason. Where hay growers are more worried about moisture content during storage periods, farmers who raise grains use moisture content to determine when it’s time to harvest. The only challenge is deciding what constitutes optimal moisture levels.

Farmers, researchers, and biologists have been arguing over grain moisture content for decades. We are getting closer to the answers as time goes by, but a lot of what goes into determining optimal moisture content is really an art perfected by the growers themselves. That’s why our grain testers are so important to them. They know what kind of moisture content they are looking for to initiate harvest. Our testers are merely tools to tell them when that moisture level has been reached.

Coffee Testers

Coffee may not necessarily be a cash crop in this country, but it still produces quite a bit of income for the growers who specialize in it. For them, moisture content signals bean maturity. This is important because moisture content also determines how a bean will be roasted, the amount of weight loss beans will undergo during the roasting process, and the quality of the finished product.

Our coffee testers tell growers everything they need to know about bean moisture content before they harvest, roast, and ship. If we can help coffee growers get it right when measuring both green and parchment beans, then we are happy to do so.

Mytee Products is working hard to find the right kinds of agricultural products to add to our inventory. We have grown our selection of moisture testers from just a few testers for hay to a much more comprehensive line that includes hay, grain, and coffee. Keep checking back to see what’s new in this category.