How to Make Using an RV Cover Easier on Yourself

An RV or trailer cover is a tool used to protect your unit when it is parked and not in use. Like any tool, there are certain things you can do to make using an RV or trailer cover easier. There is no need to struggle with your cover every time you put it on or take it off.

Efficiency is the key with RV and trailer covers. Your goal is to do as little work as possible while still providing maximum protection for your RV or trailer. So just like a truck driver seeks to learn the most efficient way to use tarps to cover flatbed loads, you can make your life easier by learning the most efficient ways to use your RV cover. We have a few tips.

1. Clean Before You Cover

One of the reasons you are using an RV cover is to protect your unit against dirt, debris, mold, and mildew during the off-season. You will not get the best use out of your cover if you don’t wash your rig before you cover it. What’s worse, covering a dirty RV or trailer could mean you’ll be scrubbing it clean at the start of the next season.

It is almost always easier to wash an RV or trailer at the end of the season. So take a few hours and do a good cleaning and drying job. You will be glad you did when you uncover a clean, shiny RV in the spring.

2. Unpack on the Ground

Have you ever tried hauling your RV cover up to the top of your rig slung over your shoulder? It is hard work. Well, there is a better way. Unpack and unfold your cover on the ground rather than carrying it to the top of your rig. You can then connect a strap to one of the corner clips and gently hoist the cover up over your rig section by section. Just go slowly so you don’t catch the cover on something and tear it.

3. Enlist Some Help

Both cleaning and covering your RV is a lot easier when you have help. And guess what? That’s what family members and friends are for. Enlist some help to make the job easier – both at the end of the season and at the start of the new one. If need be, reward your helpers with a pizza and a cold one. It’s well worth the money you’ll spend to not break your back covering and uncovering your RV.

4. Store the Cover in a Garbage Tote

We assume you’ll want to store your cover during the RV season. You can work for hours trying to fold it into a nice, flat rectangle that fits nicely on the shelf – if you enjoy that sort of thing. But there’s a better way. Purchase a plastic garbage tote on wheels.

With a garbage tote, you don’t have to fold your cover up into a perfect rectangle. Fold it twice along the length, then just roll up into a tube. It should fit nicely into your tote along with your straps, cables, hooks, etc. As an added bonus, the garbage tote will keep the cover dry and protected against heat and sunlight.

You have invested in an RV or trailer cover because you want to protect your rig. It is a very wise decision. Do yourself a favor and protect your own physical health and mental sanity by deploying the four tips we discussed here. The more efficiently you use your RV cover, the happier you are going to be.


5 Things to Know About Drip Diverter Tarps

Mytee Products sells drip diverter tarps for a variety of uses. A drip diverter tarp is an efficient and cost-effective way to temporarily manage minor water leaking from roofs, water pipes, air conditioning units, etc. If you are in need of a drip diverter tarp, we invite you to check out our inventory.

Please note that drip diverter tarps are designed for a very specific purpose. Though they can be used for other purposes, we recommend using them only for diverting leaks in interior spaces where water could pose a danger to equipment or people passing through.

Here are five things to know about drip diverter tarps in the event that you do make a purchase:

1. Drip Tarps Are a Temporary Solution

First and foremost, a drip diverter tarp is only a temporary solution to your problem. The fact that there is water leaking in needs to be addressed at some point. If you are talking a leaking roof, ignoring the leak will only make it worse. The same thing is true for leaky pipes.

If you are talking about a drip coming from an air-conditioning unit, there may be something else wrong with the unit or its drainage system. Have it looked at by a professional.

2. Drip Tarps Can Be Used with Other Solutions

A drip diverter tarp can be used with other solutions, like absorbent pads for example. Let’s say you are experiencing a water leak in the mechanical room that has water dripping down through the ceiling of the room below. You can install absorbent pads above the ceiling tiles to prevent the water from staining the tiles. Your drip diverter tarp would be there to catch any water that might leak from between the tiles.

3. You’ll Also Need a Diverter Hose

In order for your drip diverter tarp to be effective, you will need a hose that connects to the center of the tarp and carries dripping water away. The hose can be discharged in a sink, drain, or sewer. You will also need to route the hose so that it stays out of the way.

4. Suspension Methods Are Important

How you suspend a drip diverter tarp is important. Some people recommend using bungee cords that attach to each of the four corners of the tarp. Others prefer rope or wire. Regardless of your choice, the tarp needs to be secured in place so that it does not shift. If you are using the tarp to catch water from a leaky pipe, you might be able to suspend it directly from the pipe.

5. Exterior Use Can Be Tricky

Drip diverter tarps are really intended for interior use involving minor leaks. However, some of our customers have used them for exterior applications as well. This can be tricky, given the fact that rain and snow storms hardly constitute a minor drip.

A good drip diverter tarp should hold up just fine for exterior use. The trick is suspending it properly and in the right location. You might also not have to worry about using a hose, either. Depending on the water you are trying to capture and channel, you could hang one side of the tarp lower than the other to create a natural runoff.

Remember, a drip diverter tarp is a cost-effective and easy way to manage minor water leaks. Whether you’re trying to protect hay in your barn or sensitive office equipment your business relies on, a strategically placed drip diverter tarp makes a real difference. We are happy to offer several different sizes of tarps for a variety of needs.


How to Use Outrigger Pads the Safe Way

Outrigger pads are tools used to keep cranes and other pieces of heavy equipment from sinking into the ground during lifting. Anyone experienced with rigging is probably familiar with the pads to at least some extent. We sell outrigger pads as part of our inventory of rigging supplies.

We cannot stress enough the need for safety when deploying outrigger pads. As with everything related to rigging, there are safe and unsafe ways to deploy them. Relying on general rules of thumb or intuition doesn’t cut it. To be safe, you have to do things the right way.

Government Regulations

The place to begin here is with government regulations. According to OSHA, safety is always a requirement. OSHA 1926.1402 states that, in all instances in which a crane or other lifting equipment is used, the ground on which the equipment is placed must be firm, sufficiently drained, properly graded, and able to support blocking, cribbing, and outrigger pads.

OSHA regulations relate mainly to construction and industrial work. So for jobs outside their scope we look to ASME B30.5 code. This code has been approved by the U.S. government, making it legally binding. It states that any blocking or pads used to support heavy equipment must be sufficiently strong. They must be able to safely support floating and transmission of the load without excessive settlement, shifting, or toppling.

This is just a general outline of OSHA and ASME rules. For details, consult both documents online. They offer all the information you need for a safe lifting experience.

Working Load Limits

Next, it is important to know and understand the working load limits of your outrigger pads, blocking, or cribbing. The three models of outrigger pads that we sell have working load limits of 45,000, 55,000, and 60,000 pounds. All have a crush rating of 200 PSI.

These working load limits apply just to the pads themselves. They have nothing to do with the strength or support of the ground underneath. So just because you have an outrigger pad strong enough to handle the load you’re lifting doesn’t necessarily mean you’re good to go.

Making Some Calculations

Lifting safely requires a few basic calculations, beginning with the total amount of force the operation represents. Total force is really just the sum of all the ‘moving parts’, so to speak. Add together the weight of the crane, load, rigging equipment, and any accessories. The total weight equals the force of the load.

Next, you must calculate the amount of area needed to safely distribute the load across your outrigger system. For that, you’ll need to know ground (soil) pressure. The lift supervisor should provide you with that number measured as pounds per square inch (psi).

To determine area, divide the total force by the ground pressure. The resulting number will be the total area over which the weight will be distributed. Calculate the square root of that number and you’ll know how much area each of the four corners of your rigging system should cover.

In some cases, you may find your outrigger pads are sufficient in and of themselves to carry the load. Other cases might require additional blocking or cribbing underneath the pads. Just make sure you get it right one way or another.

Feel free to contact us if you have questions about our outrigger pads. Also remember that we carry a full line of rigging supplies. Whether you need slings, straps, blocks or hooks, Mytee Products probably carries it. And if we don’t, contact us anyway. We might be able to procure what you’re after.


Rigging Science: The Physics Behind the Block and Tackle

Mytee Products carries a full inventory of rigging supplies covering everything from blocks to turnbuckles and shackles. All of that is well and good, but sometimes it is helpful to understand the physics behind rigging principals. Understanding makes for safer lifts.

In light of that, we thought it might be interesting to discuss the physics behind the block and tackle principal. The block and tackle represents one of the easiest ways to lift extremely heavy loads with very little force. Block and tackle setups have been used for centuries by cultures all over the world.

The Block and Tackle Defined

A block and tackle isn’t a single piece of equipment. Instead, it is a particular kind of rigging set-up that includes multiple pulleys and some sort of means to lift the load – be it rope, wire, chain, etc. The most basic setup utilizes at least two pulleys with a rope or wire running between them.

The pulleys in a block and tackle system can be located close together or at a distance. Locations are chosen based on the nature of the lift. The pulleys on a crane might be close together while those in the warehouse rigging system are farther apart.

The Principle of Lifting Force

Physics dictates that a certain amount of force is required to lift a load off the ground. The heavier the load, the more force required. The lifting force has to be either equal to or greater than the weight of the load.

For example, imagine you are lifting a 200-pound load using a single pulley and a 200 ft. rope. You have to apply a minimum of 200 pounds of force in order to get the load off the ground. All 200 pounds will be carried by that single pulley. Also note that the amount of force you need is inversely related to the length of your rope.

If your rope is 100 feet long, more force will be required. The opposite is true if your rope is longer than 200 feet. What does this tell you? It tells you that a longer rope and more pulleys should require less lifting force from you.

Sharing the Load among Blocks

Remember that a block and tackle system utilizes multiple pulleys (or blocks) for lifting. Each of those blocks takes some of the weight of the load. So once again, let us assume a 200-pound load and two blocks in your system. Each block carries half the weight, or 100 pounds. Using the same 200-foot rope now means you only have to apply 100 pounds of lifting force instead of 200.

Introduce a third block into the system and you reduce the total weight carried by each block yet again. Instead of 100 pounds per block, you are now in the neighborhood of 70 pounds.

In theory, you can continue adding blocks and lengthening the rope to make your load even easier to lift. In practice though, there is a tipping point. Additional blocks and longer rope create resistance. Make your block and tackle system too big and the amount of resistance in the system could make it impossible to lift the load anyway. So there is a balance between distributing the weight and minimizing resistance.

Distributing the Load

The simplest way to understand the physics of a block and tackle system is to understand that each block in the system takes part of the load. It is all about load distribution. Greater distribution means less lifting force to get a load off the ground. That’s about it in a nutshell.


A Grille Guard by Any Other Name Is Still a Grille Guard

The grille guards we sell to truck drivers are based on an idea that has been around for decades. In other words, grille guards are not new technology. But today they constitute one of the hottest trends among American truckers. Larger numbers of truckers are sporting grille guards to protect the front ends of their trucks and make them look better at the same time.

Did you know that the term ‘grille guard’ is not the only term used to describe these devices? There are other terms as well, used interchangeably around the country. We will look at some of those names in this post. If you are looking for a grille guard for your truck, we invite you to check out our inventory. We may have just what you’re looking for.

Grille Guards

The name ‘grille guard’ has really become a generic term that covers all the different kinds of guards you could mount on the front of a truck. This is what causes some confusion among consumers. Technically speaking, a grille guard is any kind of guard that covers the grill area of a four wheeled vehicle. However, the existence of some of the other names for this product has led to ‘grille guard’ being a bit more specific.

A grille guard, as opposed to a bull or cow guard, tends to go across the entire front area of the truck. It protects the grill, bumper, and front lights.

Bull and Cow Guards

Two other names for the grille guard are bull and cow guard. No one knows for sure where these names came from, but many speculate they come from ranching. The idea here is that you put a guard on the front of your truck to protect it against minor collisions with bulls and cows in the field. Given that pickup trucks have replaced horses on many modern ranches, this makes a lot of sense.

The one thing to note about bull and cow guards is that they may not cover the entire front area of the truck. Smaller guards cover only the grill area. Some even come with skid plates that protect the underside of the truck from things like rocks and tree stumps.

Brush Guards

The term ‘brush guard’ is another with unknown origins. It is believed that the term originated as a way to describe a piece of equipment that would protect the front of the vehicle as it moves through tall grass and brush. A brush guard may or may not cover the entire front of the vehicle on which it is mounted.

The Name Doesn’t Really Matter

At the end of the day, the name of the guard you choose doesn’t really matter. What matters is that your grille guard fits your truck properly and provides the kind of protection you want. To that end, note that grille guards do not require cutting or drilling to install.

Grille guards are designed for specific makes and models of vehicles. As such, a guard manufactured for one type of truck may not easily mount on another without modification. That’s why we recommend only buying a grille guard manufactured for your make and model.

If you have any questions about our grille guards, please do not hesitate to contact us. We would be more than happy to help you find a guard for your truck. And while we’re here, we would like to offer you a full selection of truck tarps, rigging supplies, towing supplies, and more. We are your one-stop shop for all your cargo control needs.