Save Money on Bulk Purchase of Corner/Edge Protectors

We know that flatbed truckers have many different choices when looking for a supplier for their cargo control supplies. It is our job to give them a reason to shop with us. We work hard to do just that. One of the things we do for our customers is to strive to always offer the best possible price. Our corner and edge protectors are but one example.When you buy them in bulk from Mytee, you can save quite a bit of money.

Our 4-inch red and blue corner protectors designed for webbing between 2 and 4 inches normally sell for $1.49 per piece. If you buy at least 10, the price falls to $1.19 per piece. That works out to $11.90 for 10 or $23.80 for 20. One of the largest online retailers (whose name you are very familiar with) sells the exact same corner protector in a pack of 20 for $41.90. Their price is almost twice our price.

Both products are the same except for the color of the plastic. Both are designed to protect ratchet straps and cargo from friction damage, and both are suitable for webbing up to 4 inches wide. They have the exact same shape – down to how the outside corners are molded.

Stock Up on Them

As a flatbed truck driver, keeping an ample supply of cargo control products on your truck is all in a day’s work. You buy straps and bungees because you need them to secure cargo to the bed of your trailer. You buy corner and edge protectors to protect both straps and cargo. More importantly, you buy them because they are required by law whenever load conditions could potentially harm your straps. Since you are buying them anyway, it makes sense to purchase in bulk and save money at the same time.

Why purchase in bulk? Because things happen. The flatbed trucker will go through hundreds of corner and edge protectors during the course of a 40-year career. It’s not like you are going to buy half a dozen and expect them to last for decades. As long as you are going to need hundreds, you might just as well buy in bulk and pay less for each piece.

For the record, Mytee does not sell just one kind of edge protector. Our inventory includes more than a dozen different products ranging from the 4-inch plastic corner protector to the 4-inch rubber protector to the steel corner protector with a built-in chain slot. We even carry oil edge protectors appropriate for coil loads of up to 26 inches in diameter.

The Right Protector for the Job
Corner and edge protectors are extremely simple to use. The real trick is choosing the right protector for the job at hand. Some of the smaller models are ideal for things like brick and crated building materials while a larger v-board corner protector would be more appropriate for a piece of industrial machinery.

In closing, we want to offer couple of reminders, including the importance of using corner and edge protectors to prevent your straps from tearing or fraying. The last thing you want is to have to invest extra money in new straps because a lack of corner protectors is reducing strap life. Purchasing corner and edge protectors costs a lot less than constantly replacing your straps.

Also remember your legal responsibility to properly secure cargo. You could be found in violation if you’re not using corner protectors on a load for which an inspector deems them necessary. It is better to just not take any chances.


The Secret to Preventing Tarp Billowing

After spending 20 to 30 minutes tarping a load, nothing aggravates a flatbed trucker more than looking out the mirror 25 miles down the road and seeing one or more of those tarps billowing in the wind. Billowing tarps reduce fuel efficiency and risk both straps and cargo. Truckers hate billowing tarps.

The question many new truck drivers struggle with is how to prevent billowing. After all, moving down the highway at 65 mph creates a lot of air movement around a flatbed load. Any natural wind added to the equation just makes things worse.

So, what is the solution? The secret to preventing tarp billowing is in how tarps are applied at various points of a load.

In the below post, we will explain how to secure tarps that will not billow as you drive down the road. You can use ratchet straps, bungee straps, bungee rope, or even nylon rope as you see fit. A combination of bungee straps and ratchet straps is the best way to go for efficiency and speed.

Tight at the Front

Physics and common sense dictate that air flows across a load from front to back. Therefore, common sense also dictates that tarps should be getting the most attention at the front of the load. Veteran truckers who tarp well, will tell you that the front of the load is key.

The most important thing for preventing billowing is to make sure the tarp at the front is as flat and tight as possible. If you do not give air a clear path under the front of the tarp, you will reduce the likelihood of billowing across its entire surface. So think tight and flat.

One suggestion from veteran truckers is to start by securing the front corners of the tarp with bungee straps. Pull the tarp tight and secure the rear with bungee straps as well. Then go back to the front of the load and apply one ratchet strap across the top of the tarp as far forward as possible. You can then use bungee straps or bungee rope to go around the front edge of the tarp, hooking to a strap on either side, to keep the vertical surface of the tarp lying flat.

Work Your Way Back

Once the front of the tarp is flat and secure, work your way back. Use additional bungee straps at key points to secure the tarp to either your trailer or the load itself. Another ratchet strap across the middle of the tarp will keep that section flat. Finally, wrap the entire perimeter of the load using bungee rope from corner to corner. This keeps the edges of the tarp secure against the load.

The advantage of using bungee rope here is that you can apply fairly large sections of rope without creating a safety hazard or risking damage to the load.

One veteran trucker we know offers another tip that makes sense. He says that it helps to take a few extra minutes to make sure tarps are applied evenly. An uneven tarp is harder to keep flat and tight because you are working with different amounts of material at various points across the load. An even tarp gives you the same amount of material at the critical points, making it possible to apply even tension with each bungee or ratchet strap you use.

Remember, the secret to preventing tarp billowing is to concentrate on the front of the load in order to ensure the tarp is flat and tight. If you can conquer the front of the load, the rest should be fairly easy.


A Guide To Maintaining Your Mytee Products Tool Box

You have invested in a brand-new aluminum toolbox for your truck. Congratulations. Your purchase of a toolbox from Mytee Products means years of reliable service from a great product that has been manufactured to the highest possible standards. We assume you are going to want to keep your toolbox looking as new as possible for as long as possible. We want to help you do just that.

Cleaning and polishing aluminum toolboxes used to involve a lot of elbow grease and valuable time that could have been spent on other things. Not so in the modern era. We now have access to a number of excellent cleaning products that make it possible to restore your aluminum toolboxes to like-new condition with minimal physical effort. In this post, we will describe what those products are and how you can use them to keep your toolboxes looking like they just came from the show room.

Why Cleaning A Tool Box

Before we get to the actual cleaning and polishing process, let us talk about why cleaning tool boxes is necessary. It boils down primarily to the metal – aluminum’s natural tendency to oxidize.

Aluminum is a great material for all sorts of applications that involve exposure to the elements. Aluminum naturally oxidizes when exposed to the air, creating a thin film that protects the metal from corrosion. This characteristic is one of the reasons things like canoes and rowboats are often made of aluminum.

That dingy coating that seems to cover trucker’s toolboxes and wheel rims is nothing more than the film produced by oxidation. You can leave the film alone and your aluminum toolboxes and rims would be just fine. But it does look dingy and old, which is why we clean and polish. The idea is to get rid of the film without exposing the metal to environmental damage.

Deoxidize First

The first step in cleaning your aluminum toolbox is to deoxidize. There are numerous products sold in liquid form for this purpose. You simply apply a small amount to the surface of the aluminum and then work it in. Many experienced truckers use a scrap of old carpet so as to avoid scratching the metal during the process.

Work in the deoxidizer or until the surface of the metal shows a uniform, whitish color across the surface. If you are working with diamond plated aluminum, you will need to apply the deoxidizer in four different directions: clockwise, counterclockwise, and then in each direction of the diamonds. This removes the oxidation build-up on the diamond edges.

Polish Second

Once you’ve achieved that uniform whitish color, you know the deoxidation part is done. The second step is to take some liquid polish to the metal. Apply a small amount and then work it in with a piece of carpet (or whatever else you used) in the same four directions. Working the polish in will create a dark, almost black film. When you start seeing bright aluminum shining through that film you will know that the polishing process is complete.

Finally, take a rag or towel to the metal to remove the polish. Work in the same four directions until all the polish is removed. You will be left with bright, beautiful, and protected aluminum.

Here’s one last tip: do not try to do the entire surface of the aluminum toolbox all at once. Work in small sections so that you don’t give either the deoxidizer or polish any chance to begin solidifying. This will create a uniform finish when you’re all done. Between cleanings, a little cooking spray can help remove dirt and bugs without harming the protective layer of polish.


When Hay Tarps Need A Little Help To Do the Job

Farmers who count on hay to supplement their income cannot afford to lose any of their crop. Hay prices seldom experience a lot of fluctuation, and growers do worry about mold and combustion. They do not need additional problems created by critters who happen to find their hay crops inviting. Farmers know that sometimes those critters can be so challenging that they need an additional layer of help so hay tarps can do their job successfully.

Hay stacks should definitely be covered by something. Whether that something is a collection of hay tarps or the roof of a barn, that is entirely up to the farmer, but keeping hay covered is essential to protecting its value. Then other measures should be taken if critters become a problem. For the purposes of illustration, we will talk about rabbits, elk, and deer.

Rabbits in Idaho

Over this past winter and spring, there were numerous reports out of Idaho involving an exploding jack rabbit population. Apparently, jack rabbit populations in the Gem State are cyclical in nature. Every 4 to 5 years there is a population explosion that causes big problems for hay farmers. The winter of 2016/2017 proved to be one with a significant jack rabbit population.

The rabbits are not afraid to help themselves to hay stacks when winter weather prevents them from foraging elsewhere. The problem was so bad this past winter that growers had to take to patrolling their hay stacks during the overnight hours to keep the animals away. Some were going so far as to hire friends and family members to take shifts so that coverage would be there all night.

Rabbits cause problems with hay in two ways. First, they chew around the base of hay stacks as they feed. Extensive chewing will destabilize a stack, potentially causing it to come crashing down. Even if that doesn’t happen, there’s a second problem: chewing rabbits can break through baling twine with no problem at all. The combination of instability and broken twine makes loading hay bales a lot more difficult.

Elk and Deer

When elk and deer are a problem for hay stacks, it could be for one of two reasons. First is the same kind of problem that the jack rabbits create. Foraging elk and deer destabilize hay stacks whenever they feed. The destabilization isn’t usually a serious though because elk and deer feed higher up on the stack. But there is a second issue that can create bigger headaches.

Elk and deer have a habit of getting their antlers entangled in hay tarps and anchor ropes. If they get tangled too tightly, they can completely rip down a hay tarp in an attempt to escape. Then the farmer has to replace the tarp and rope in addition to working on any damage done to his property and the hay stack.

So what are hay farmers to do? In Idaho, the Department of Fish and Game has already funded programs for farmers looking to fence their hay stacks. The right kind of fencing can keep deer and elk out. The department may look into funding a solution for the jack rabbits next winter if it looks like another year of unusually high numbers of rabbits.

A jack rabbit solution would be something similar to a mesh screen that could be placed around the base of a stack. Combining both a mesh screen and a decent fence could all but eliminate the risk of critters harming stored hay. Then it would be back to ensuring hay tarps are deployed in such a way as to protect against moisture and debris.

Sources:

Capital Press – http://www.capitalpress.com/Idaho/20170306/east-idaho-hay-farmers-lose-sleep-over-jackrabbits


Canvas Tarps and Cargo Control

Here is a hypothetical scenario between a customer and truck driver who have a slight difference in opinion of how to control and protect cargo. A truck driver arrives to pick up a load from a well-paying customer who insists on using canvas tarps. The trucker is no fan of canvas, being that it is a much heavier material and can be a bit tedious to manage without assistance. But canvas is what the customer wants, so canvas is what the truck driver uses.

Truck drivers may spend some time and energy mulling over their difference in view points with shippers about cargo control and tarping. From our point of view, it is wasted time and energy. Shippers and receivers are paying for the service that truckers provide. Without those shippers and receivers, it would be hard to imagine how cargo management would take place smoothly.Also building a trusting relationship with both, shippers and receivers results in more trucking business.

The Shipper’s View of Cargo

One of the reasons truck drivers struggle with cargo control and carving requirements is a lack of understanding of how shippers and receivers view cargo. This is understandable as each is a subject matter expert in their own right. In fact, truckers view cargo in an entirely different way – as we will explain in the next section. As for shippers and receivers, they see cargo in one of several ways.

First, the cargo a shipper sends on the back of a flatbed truck can be viewed as a source of income. Let’s say the shipper is a manufacturer of paver stones and bricks. Every load sent out on the back of a truck represents a revenue stream. Maximizing revenue is about making sure loads get to their destinations fully intact and without damage. Cargo control and tarping are seen as tools for maximizing revenue streams.

Receivers view cargo in much the same way, though a bit more indirectly. A retailer receiving a load of paver stones and bricks may see those individual pieces as revenue generators, but they are also viewed as part of a much larger inventory that speaks volumes about the retailer’s reputation as a supplier. The retailer cannot afford damaged or blemished products that could harm the business’s reputation.

A third way of viewing cargo is a bit more personal. Take the owner of several classic cars as an example. Those cars are more than just frames with four wheels and an engine. Classic car collectors often treat their vehicles as parts of an extended family. They are investments that are highly personal and, as such, involve an emotional attachment. Truckers would expect a classic car owner to require canvas tarps instead of poly. Canvas is safer for a car’s delicate finish.

The Driver’s View of Cargo

Conflict between truckers and shippers/receivers can arise because of the driver’s different view. For the average truck driver, there is no personal or emotional attachment to cargo. The cargo is not seen as a direct revenue stream either. The trucker is being paid for a service, not for the product on the back of the trailer.

Finn Murphy, a veteran truck driver and mover interviewed by FleetOwner this past July, refers to this view among truckers as the ‘Buddhist view of attachment’. He explains that drivers do not attach any intrinsic value to the cargo they are carrying. It is just freight. Still, Murphy recognizes the trucker’s responsibility to protect that freight at all costs for the benefit of shippers and receivers.

A shipper or receiver may require the use of canvas tarps for any number of reasons. That’s fine. It’s really up to them to decide how they want their cargo protected from point A to point B. Despite the Buddhist view of attachment, it is up to truck drivers to do what makes customers happy.

Sources:

FleetOwner – http://fleetowner.com/driver-management-resource-center/high-end-bedbugger-and-buddhist-view-attachment