More from: load binders

It’s Time for Your Winter Inventory Check

With winter just a few months away, now is the right time for the trucker’s annual winter inventory check. Look through your toolboxes to make sure you have exactly what you need for tough winter driving and cargo control. Repair what needs fixing, replace what needs to be replaced, and buy any additional trucking supplies you need to fill in gaps in your inventory.

truck-winter

Mytee Products has everything you need for safe and productive winter driving. We invite you to browse our entire inventory for the following critical supplies:

Truck Tarps
Every trucker who does flatbed work needs to have a full selection of tarps on hand at all times. During the winter months, the trucker’s choice of tarps can mean the difference between adequate protection and taking risks with cargo. In terms of fabrics, there are three main choices:

  • Poly Tarps
    Made of polyethylene or polypropylene, poly tarps are considered all-purpose tarps. They are generally UV-treated and waterproof, so they’re not bad as general tools for cargo control. They may not be the best choice during harsh winter weather that can include very low temperatures.
  • Vinyl Tarps
    Also known as heavy duty tarps or machinery tarps, vinyl tarps tend to be the strongest and most durable that truckers can buy. They provide the most resistance against stress, tearing and abrasions, and they can handle cold temperatures exceptionally well. The best vinyl tarps on the market don’t even flinch at temperatures well below zero.
  • Canvas Tarps
    Canvas tarps are a good choice when breathability is an issue. They also handle cold temperatures well, but struggle with standing water. Canvas tarps are subject to mold growth and could tear as a result of ice buildup. It is advisable to use them with caution during the winter.

Tires and Chains

Every trucker knows how critical tires are in bad weather. Good tires are essential during the winter months, as are chains. Make sure all of your tires are in good condition before winter weather sets in. We also advise truckers who frequently travel through areas requiring tire chains to purchase their own rather than relying on chain banks. We carry both singles and doubles.

Straps, Binders, and Winches

Cold temperatures and high winds can make securing cargo a real challenge during the winter. Cargo control is easier when the truck driver has the right kinds of supplies in good working condition. Therefore, check your toolbox for an ample supply of mesh and bungee straps, binders, winches, and chains. If any of your straps are worn, keep in mind that cold temperatures could cause them to fail at any point. Worn straps should be replaced.

Along with straps, binders and winches, drivers should have an ample supply of corner and edge protectors. Remember that even vinyl tarps can get brittle in cold temperatures. Where corner and edge protectors may not be necessary during the warmer temperatures of summer, they could make a real difference in protecting your tarps once temperatures drop.

Get What You Need Now

Investing in the trucking supplies you need for winter earlier ensures that you will receive everything you order before the weather begins to get troublesome. Winter weather makes for more difficult driving even with the proper supplies on hand. Don’t make your job more difficult than it needs to be this winter by ignoring your inventory of trucking supplies. Order your supplies from Mytee Products; if we do not have something you need, contact us anyway. We might be able to get it for you.

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Tarps and Straps: Above or Below?

One of the questions we frequently hear from new flatbed truckers is whether to strap a load above the tarp or not. This question arises from the fact that new truckers see their veteran counterparts do it both ways. Some like their straps above the tarps; others like them below. But it is truly a preference thing. There is no single way to use flatbed tarps and strap systems as long as the load is protected and the tarps and straps survive the trip undamaged.

What new drivers should understand is why veterans choose one set up over the other. They also need to know that the same driver may use different setups depending on the load being transported. It is like choosing between Kelley and Triangle truck and trailer tires – drivers make their cargo control choices depending on the loads they typically carry.

tarps and straps

Straps Applied Above Tarps

There are two primary reasons you may see truckers apply their straps over the top rather than underneath their tarps. The first is to prevent the tarps from ballooning in the wind. In such a case, the load itself has already been secured underneath with either chains or additional mesh straps. The tarp has been applied only to protect the cargo from wind and road debris. This set up makes it easy to apply flatbed tarps with very little fuss while using straps to prevent ballooning.

The second reason for strapping over the top of the tarp is to secure a soft load and preventing ballooning at the same time. A good example would be transporting crates of vegetables from a farm to the processor. Such a load is unlikely to be traveling hundreds of miles, so the driver is not worried about securing both the load and the tarps separately. He or she will just throw the flatbed tarp over the load, followed by securing each stack of crates – and the tarp at the same time – with a strap.

Straps Applied Under Tarps

Likewise, there are several reasons for applying straps underneath flatbed tarps. The first is to make sure maximum load securement is achieved. Sometimes a trucker will carry a load that does not conform well to tarping, so placing straps above the tarp would not provide the best securement. By strapping underneath, where straps come in direct contact with the load itself, the cargo can be made more secure. A tarp goes on top, secured at the corner and along the sides with bungee cords.

Drivers may also choose to apply straps underneath in order to avoid loose corners flapping in the wind. They use the same setup as described above. Flatbed tarps are placed over the already secured load and held in place with bungee cords. Along the same lines, this setup is also preferred among drivers who do not like the visual presentation of exterior straps.

Lastly, there are cases in which the driver really has no choice. Drywall is a great example. Most drywall shippers tarp their loads in the shipping yard so that there is never a question about the drywall being protected. All the driver has to do is to secure the load to the trailer and pull away.

Regardless of how you decide to use your tarps and straps, Mytee Products has a full selection of both. We also carry a full line of cargo securement supplies, tires (including 11R22.5 and 11R24.5 truck tires), tarping systems and accessories, portable carports and storage structures and, of course, a full line of steel, lumber, hay, and mesh tarps. If you need it, we have it.


EPDM Rubber Bungee Straps

Those black, rubber bungee straps truckers use to secure tarps are so easy to find that they are often taken for granted. However, did you know that the modern bungee strap is a relatively new invention? It hasn’t been around that long when you consider that a French scientist invented the first artificial rubber polymer in the 1870s. What he learned about synthetic rubber more than 130 years ago paved the way for creating the flexible, durable, and easy-to-use bungee straps that are common find in the modern marketplace.

It turns out that synthetic rubber was developed largely in response to the needs of the burgeoning auto industry in the early 20th century. Natural rubber was expensive to produce and not very durable for things such as car tires. Making matters worse were the first and second world wars, two eras in which rubber was hard to come by.

bungee-straps

In the years following World War II, discoveries on a variety of synthetic rubber products were made that would have various uses. One of those products was something known as ethylene propylene diene monomer (M-class) (EPDM) rubber, the rubber used to make bungee straps.It is an ideal kind of rubber for a multitude of products, including bungee straps and roofing materials.

Strengths of EPDM Rubber

EPDM rubber is an ideal material for bungee straps because it is resilient to hydraulic fluids, alkalis, and ketones. It is popular with truckers because of its extreme weather resistance. EPDM rubber holds up as well in subfreezing temperatures as it does in extremely warm temperatures and bright sunshine.

Imagine trying to tie down a canvas tarp using ropes during the middle of winter. The average trucker would have to go without gloves in order to get a good, tight knot. Nevertheless, with rubber bungee straps, you just hook the strap and go. It is quick, it is easy, and you can do it while still wearing your gloves.

Challenges of EPDM Rubber

As great as EPDM is for rubber bungee straps, it does have a few albeit minor challenges. Most of them arise due to the fact that EPDM it is a polymer made from petroleum byproducts. This means it is susceptible to damage from certain kinds of solvents and acids, gasoline, oil and kerosene. Truckers have to be very careful about using these substances near bungee straps.

Due to the flexibility of EPDM rubber, they perform best when used with other products to secure cargo in place. That is where webbing straps and chains come into play. Bungee straps are usually suitable for keeping tarps in place during transit.

Mytee carries several different sizes of manufactured EPDM rubber bungee straps with galvanized steel hooks. We also carry solid core rubber rope that truckers can bought in bulk and cut into customized sizes. Rubber rope hooks are available for use with this rope as well.

Thanks to some creative scientists looking for a better alternative to natural rubber, we now have EPDM synthetic rubber and products made from it. 130 years ago, who knew how vital synthetic rubber would be to the trucking industry in the 21st century?


Car Transport: Chains or Winch Straps

Which is better for car transport, chains or winch straps? This question has been debated for decades. It turns out that there is no right or wrong here. It can be a bit of a predicament to judge which products benefits outweighs the other as all that matters is that the straps are used properly to protect and secure the car being transported.

Having said that, transport chains seem to be the preferred tool of choice among companies that specialize in mass car transport. Smaller companies who transport single vehicles for individual owners tend to prefer the winch straps. Let us step back and look at both. Each has its advantages and disadvantages.

Transport Chains

Transport chains were the industry-standard before webbing straps were introduced to the freight forwarding industry. Chains are strong, durable, and more than capable of handling the weight of heavy cars. Using them for car transport is not difficult either. If you can use a hook and a ratchet, the system is pretty simple.

Here are some things to consider:

•Vehicle Hook Mounts – Automakers now build hook mounts into their vehicles as a matter of course. Two mounts are located at the front of the frame, usually on either side of the radiator, while rear mounts can be found near the rear axle. A driver simply hooks a chain to each of the mounts and tightens it down with the ratchet.

car transport

•Chain Tension – The biggest disadvantage to using chains is the possibility of damaging a vehicle by ratcheting them too tightly. A chain should provide just enough tension to keep the vehicle secure without pulling on it. Chains that are too tight can bend frames and do other sorts of damage.

•Improper Hooking – The other concern of using transport chains comes by way of drivers that might be unaware of the hook mounts. Without this knowledge, they may choose to hook chains to axles or bumpers, causing significant damage once tension is applied. If chains are to be used, drivers need to be educated in how to use them.

Winch Straps

Winch straps can be used for car transport by securing them around wheels. Straps are considered safer and significantly less damaging to cars, so manufacturers are beginning to look at mandating their use for new car transport. As long as the straps are used properly, they keep the vehicle just as secure as chains while mitigating risk of damage to axles and frames. The flexibility of the straps also enables a minimal amount of movement to accommodate for road shock.

As with transport chains, winch straps can be installed improperly. For example, allowing a strap to come in direct contact with wheel rims can scratch the finish or do other types of damage. Axles can also be damaged if tension is not applied evenly to all four tires. Having said that, the industry sees very few problems with winch straps overall.

As a truck driver, you may have to decide between transport chains and winch straps – even if you are not transporting cars. It is a good idea to thoroughly research both options along with the implications of using each one. Remember, the right tool for the load will make your job as a truck driver a lot easier.


Essential Tools for Cargo Securement

The average consumer has some knowledge on trucking and cargo transportation depending upon their personal relocating experiences. Some truck drivers who are relatively new to the trucking profession tend to be unfamiliar to the tricks of tarping and protecting the load they are about to transport. Yet proper cargo securement is a matter of having the right tools at hand for each job.

Whether someone is new to the profession or is a veteran trucker, at the end of the day, it boils down to remembering and applying the basic rules of cargo securement. It is about preventing a load from shifting in any way that could damage cargo or cause it to fall from the trailer so that it reaches it destination safely.

Here are some essential and helpful tools truckers could use to protect their truckload:

E-Track Straps

E-Track straps are primarily used for dry goods or refrigerated trailers. It is a slotted rail normally installed along both sides of a trailer’s interior at a height matching that of the cargo. The purpose of e-track is to keep the cargo in place and prevent is from sliding around.

This can be accomplished in one of two ways. The first is to use a shoring bar or decking beam made of aluminum and galvanized steel. Each end of the bar is fitted with a mechanism that fits into the e-track and locks into place. A shoring bar can handle pretty substantial loads. Where more flexibility is required, ratchet straps can be used in place of the rigid shoring bar. Straps are attached on both sides of the trailer and ratcheted together in the middle.

truck-straps

Winch Straps

Winch straps tend to be popular with flatbed truck drivers. They are made with heavy duty webbing material that meets or exceeds all DOT regulations and industry standards. They typically come with a flat hook, wire hook or chain anchor on one hand. Winch straps get that name because they are tightened down using a standard winch system. They provide maximum cargo securement strength in a package that is easy to deploy.

Corner and Edge Protectors

Truck drivers never simply back up to a trailer, hook it and go. They have to make sure their loads are secured properly prior to departure. Flatbed drivers have to place tarps over their cargo as well. Tarps are used to protect cargo from varying weather conditions, road situation and while they use the right corner and edge protectors to protect their tarps from wear and tear.

Corner and edge protectors are a great option as there are many choices available depending on the application. For example, a pyramid shaped tarp protector needs to be used if a load may cut or rip the tarp. These small pieces of plastic are placed over sharp corners and secured with webbing.

Another popular option is the v-shaped edge protector. This tool comes in a variety of sizes and can be made of plastic or metal. V-Shaped edge protectors are used to protect cargo, tarps, and straps.

Having the right tools for cargo securement makes the trucker’s job much easier. Mytee Products carries a wide range of essential load securement tools that range from straps to edge protectors to high-quality tarps needed in North America.