The Real Value of Corner and Edge Protectors

Corner and edge protectors represent a rather insignificant investment on the part of the flatbed truck. They cost a lot less than tarps, winch straps, and just about all the other cargo control supplies you might purchase. They certainly cost less than paying for damaged cargo. However, the real value in corner edge protectors is not found in the retail price. It is found in what they do for the truck driver.

Just to be clear, corner and edge protectors are used to eliminate direct contact between cargo and tarps and, when necessary, other pieces of cargo. They can be made of steel, plastic, or rubber. Mytee Products carries 14 different options in a variety of styles, materials, and colors.

Edge Protectors Save You Money

The first thing corner and edge protectors do for the truck driver is save money. How so? Remember, truck drivers are responsible for the integrity of their loads from the moment of pick up until the time of unloading. If anything arrives damaged, the driver could be financially liable.

Flatbed truckers commonly carry cargo insurance for their own protection. But keep in mind that insurance rates stay low only if the driver does not make any claims. By investing a small amount in corner and edge protectors, drivers are reducing the likelihood of damaged cargo that could result in an insurance claim. They are keeping their insurance rates as low as possible at the same time. That saves money.

Corner Protectors Protect the Driver’s Reputation

As a flatbed trucker, you may not run into too many shippers willing to mandate the use of corner and edge protectors. Yet they still expect you to take good care of the cargo you are being entrusted with. Don’t you think shippers are paying attention to what you do? Of course they are.

When shippers and receivers know a truck driver voluntarily uses corner and edge protectors, they think more highly of that driver. It goes without saying that a driver’s reputation to protect cargo is improved with every effort taken to properly protect cargo. Furthermore, drivers with good reputations for cargo control get the most lucrative loads more often.

Edge Protectors Reduce Driver Anxiety

You can value your edge and corner protectors in dollars and cents simply by keeping track of how much money you spend on them. But those little pieces of plastic and metal can do something for you that cannot be valued in terms of money: they can greatly reduce or completely eliminate your anxiety.

Anxiety over protecting cargo is part and parcel with flatbed trucking. Preventing damage is always at the back of the trucker’s mind, as it should be. But why be more anxious than you need to be? Better yet, why be anxious at all? If you use corner and edge protectors the way they are supposed to be used, the risk of damage from contact with other surfaces is minimal. So is the risk of damage from road vibration.

Purchase Your Corner Protectors from Mytee

The amount of money you invest in an ample supply of corner and edge protectors is relatively minor compared to what you invest in other cargo control supplies. In light of that, there really is no valid reason to not have edge and corner protectors in your toolbox. We recommend a variety of options including steel protectors with chain slots, elongated v-board edge protectors, plastic tarp protectors, and rubber corner protectors.

Before you decide to purchase your next round of corner and edge protectors, browse our inventory. We have everything you need at very reasonable prices.


3 Ways to Temporarily Install Shade Tarps

Most of the tarps we sell at Mytee Products are intended for use by truck drivers looking to protect the cargo they transport. Yet, we also carry a couple of other kinds of tarps as well. Among them are shade mesh tarps available in black and green. Construction companies often use shade tarps to create privacy screening around building sites. As a truck driver and homeowner, you could use shade tarps around the house for several reasons.

In this post, we will describe three ways to install shade tarps for temporary use. In every case, the point is to provide a level of shade. Installations are temporary in nature because the idea is to take the tarps down just before winter weather hits. You are really only trying to provide shade during the hot summer months.

Method #1 – Using Trees or Structures

Let’s say you want to install a shade tarp to park your truck under during your two-week summer vacation. Some truckers do this to prevent excessive heat buildup while they are away. In either case, you need to get the tarp up high enough to accommodate the height of your tractor. Tent poles are probably not going to be suitable for this situation.

The easiest way to accomplish this idea, is to string the tarp between trees or building structures on your property. Just tie a rope to each of the four corners and away you go. The only tricky component to this installation is determining the right tie down locations without having to run ropes too far. The longer the ropes, the more difficult it will be to maintain good tension.

A suggestion is to pull your truck up next to a garage or barn with trees nearby. You could attach one end of the tarp to the structure and the other ends to a couple of trees.

Method #2 – A-Frame Installation

The second method of installation is one that campers use all the time for erecting tarps above their tents. It is known as A-frame installation because you are creating a shape similar to an A-frame house. It is simple to do, so it’s pretty effective for a lot of different uses.

To begin with, string a piece of rope between two trees or structures near the area you want shaded. Next, lay the tarp over the rope exactly where you want it. Finally, secure the tarp with additional ropes and stakes driven into the ground. You now have an A-frame shade structure that you can sit under, park your bicycles under, etc.

Method #3 – 4-Pole Installation

To create a shaded sitting area, there is no better installation than the 4-pole installation. For this installation, you just need four tent poles, a sturdy rope, and a few stakes. You can make your own tent poles pretty easily if you don’t already own them.

Installation is a simple matter of placing a tent pole at each of the four corners, attaching a rope to each pole, then pulling the ropes till they are taut and staking them down. For extra structural integrity, you can add more poles around the perimeter or just stake the tarp directly to the ground with rope.

The beauty of this installation is that you can set the height of your shade tarp as you desire. If you want it higher, you can go as high as your tent poles allow.
Shade tarps make great temporary shelters from the hot, summer sun. Mytee Products is happy to carry both black and green shade tarps in nearly a dozen different sizes.


Tips for Getting Better Use from Great Ratchet Straps

Ratchet straps are among the most important tools used by flatbed truckers. They keep cargo secure from point A to point B, sometimes in concert with chains, tarps, and bungee straps. Mytee Products carries a complete inventory of ratchet straps and cargo control equipment from well-known manufacturers.

The ratchet straps you buy from us are already top-of-the-line quality. But we have a few tips for getting better use out of them. With a little care and attention, you can extend the life of your straps.

Regularly Lubricate Ratchets

While the material used to make the straps is not bothered by weather, ratchets are. The best way to keep ratchets in good working order is to regularly lubricate them with a lithium grease. This is the same product auto mechanics use to lubricate car parts because it holds up very well even under extreme temperatures. It will wash away after time, which is why you need to apply regularly.

The key with lubrication is to hit all the moving parts. It doesn’t take much, either. Just a little spritz and a few seconds to work it in will keep everything working even on the coldest of days.

Thread from Underneath

When threading ratchets with new strap material, always run the strap from underneath the ratchet rather than over the top. This results in the short end being on the top while the main portion of the strap is below. Physics dictates the straps will slip a lot more easily when disengaged if threaded this way.

Leave Plenty of Room for Ratchet Extension

When tying down a load, keep in mind that the ratchet has to be extended beyond the gear teeth to release the tension pin that keeps the strap in place under load. It is a wise idea to leave enough space under the ratchet to be able to reach underneath and fully extend the ratchet to release it. If you do not leave enough space to pull down on the ratchet and fully extend it, you will have trouble releasing the strap to unload.

Do Not Let Extra Strap Hang Loose

Sometimes you have loads that are not tall enough to require the full length of your ratchet straps. So what do you do with the excess strap material? Truck drivers have all sorts of tricks for dealing with it. The one thing you do not want to do is let the excess strap hang loose. Loose strap flapping in the wind risks cargo damage and shortens the life of the strap material.

Some truck drivers roll the excess strap and then bind it with a bungee cord. Others tie a series of knots and tuck any remaining strap in under the tense part of the strap, or even under a tarp. Still others use a looping technique that utilizes the excess strap to secure it. There are dozens of ways to do it.

Our final tip is something that every truck driver should already be doing. Ratchet straps are tough and reliable, and are subject to wear and tear just like anything else. Therefore, it’s very important that truck drivers inspect their straps on a regular basis. Any strap showing signs of wear or tear needs to be addressed immediately. If you do not check your straps routinely, rest assured that roadside inspectors will.

Mytee products is here to serve you and your needs as a truck driver. We are your one-stop choice for ratchet straps, truck tarps, bungee cords, and everything else you need to do your job.


Aluminum Toolboxes: Organization Tips for Truckers

The average flatbed trucker has at least one toolbox affixed to his or her rig. Some have a large trailer toolbox and two aluminum step boxes to maximize storage space, and some drivers have even more. The thing to remember is that proper organization of aluminum toolboxes maximizes storage space and reduces the frustrations of not being able to find the tool you’re after when you need it.

What constitutes the right number and size of toolboxes isn’t for us to say. Every flatbed trucker has his or her own preferences. But Mytee can offer a few organizational tips to help truckers make the most of their storage space. Keep in mind that we carry a full inventory of aluminum toolboxes for truck drivers and pickup truck owners.

 

Organizing Tarps

Assuming you are the kind of trucker who stores tarps and toolboxes, the first rule of thumb is to consider which tarps you use most often. Let’s say you regularly haul lumber loads that require coverage on all sides. You are going to want those tarps easily accessible at all times.

You may have a selection of smaller smoke tarps or general purpose canvas tarps that you only use every once in a while for machinery loads. Because they are used less frequently, you can store them on the bottom of your toolbox in favor of putting your lumber tarps on top.

One thing to note is that tarps should never be put away while still wet. If throwing a wet tarp into a tool box is unavoidable at the time, it should be retrieved and dried out as soon as possible. Leaving tarps in long-term storage with moisture trapped in the folds is a good recipe for mold.

Organizing Tools

When it comes to tools, truckers need to separate things like ratchet straps and binders from the hand tools used to perform regular maintenance. It’s a good idea to keep them in separate toolboxes if you have the space. If not, divide existing toolbox into two separate compartments using a piece of scrap wood or metal.

Ratchet straps can be rolled up and stacked very neatly in one corner of the box. Chains can be coiled and stacked in another corner. Binders, hooks, and other similar tools can then be placed in the center of the compartment. As for those hand tools, keep them separated according to tool type. Put all your sockets in one location, all the wrenches in another, etc. Organizing hand tools is a lot easier if you invest in some shelves and smaller boxes that can fit inside your main toolbox.

Everything in Its Place

It should be obvious that the strategy we are promoting here follows that old adage that says, ‘a place for everything and everything in its place’. The hard part is not necessarily finding a place for everything that needs to be stored. It is finding the most efficient place and then making sure that the items are returned to their places after use.

Few things are as frustrating as having a journey interrupted by some sort of failure and then not being able to find the tools you need to fix the problem. Equally frustrating is the task of securing a load and having to dig through your toolbox looking for the right straps or chains. Organizing your toolboxes changes all that.

An organized toolbox – where everything has a fixed place that never changes – is one that lends itself very well to efficiency and productivity. Take it from us; you’ll be glad you organized your equipment once you do it.


Why Headache Racks: The Definitive Answer

If we earned $100 every time a new flatbed truck driver asked us how the headache rack got its name, we might not have to sell trucking supplies to stay in business. Be that as it may, the question about the name of headache racks is as old as the rack itself.

For the record, a headache rack is a large piece of steel or aluminum mounted on the back of a truck cab. You see them on 18 wheelers and larger pickup trucks. Professional truck drivers often use their headache racks as a place to hang their chains and bungee straps.

For the remainder of this post, we want to talk about the name ‘headache rack’ and where it came from. If you are looking for a definitive answer, we have it: there is no definitive answer.

Protecting the Driver from Renegade Cargo

The first explanation of the headache rack name has to do with renegade cargo crashing through the back of a truck cab and injuring the driver. For a long time, there was a popular article circulating on the internet claiming that both the name and the device itself goes back to the days when surfing first became popular.

As the thinking goes, the racks were installed on pickup trucks to prevent harm to drivers if a surfboard were to break loose and crash through the back window. There’s only one problem with this theory: headache racks were around before surfing became popular. Second, you can spend all day traversing the roads of California and Hawaii, and you will probably never see a pickup truck with a headache rack carrying a load of surfboards.

There are other stories that use the same general theme without specifically referencing surfboards. The general idea being that headache racks are really the domain of pickup truck drivers attempting to protect their own heads.

Giving the Driver Headache

The second explanation is one that makes more sense where truck drivers are concerned. This explanation suggests that drivers, while working around their rigs securing cargo or doing maintenance, have a tendency to hit their heads on the metal racks. Unwittingly striking your head on such a large piece of metal would undoubtedly result in a headache.

If you are a professional truck driver, you are familiar with the scenario described here. Every truck driver has done it at least once, and many of you know drivers who do it routinely. Some hit their head so often that they have permanent marks. It is not a pleasant experience, to say the least.

We Have What You Need

The definitive answer about why headache racks are called as such is clear: there is no definitive answer. Therefore, there is no need for truck drivers to dispute or debate any longer. Far better to put your energies into being better drivers capable of delivering loads on time and in good condition.

As for the headache racks themselves, rest assured that Mytee Products has what you need. We have seven different models to fit a variety of needs and styles. We also carry installation kits, chain hangers, light brackets, and even tarp trays.

Your headache rack does not have to give you a headache at the time of purchase. Just shop the Mytee Products inventory to find what you’re looking for, make a quick purchase, and relax while we ship it right to your door. You’ll be protecting your head, or injuring it, in no time at all.