When Hay Tarps Need A Little Help To Do the Job

Farmers who count on hay to supplement their income cannot afford to lose any of their crop. Hay prices seldom experience a lot of fluctuation, and growers do worry about mold and combustion. They do not need additional problems created by critters who happen to find their hay crops inviting. Farmers know that sometimes those critters can be so challenging that they need an additional layer of help so hay tarps can do their job successfully.

Hay stacks should definitely be covered by something. Whether that something is a collection of hay tarps or the roof of a barn, that is entirely up to the farmer, but keeping hay covered is essential to protecting its value. Then other measures should be taken if critters become a problem. For the purposes of illustration, we will talk about rabbits, elk, and deer.

Rabbits in Idaho

Over this past winter and spring, there were numerous reports out of Idaho involving an exploding jack rabbit population. Apparently, jack rabbit populations in the Gem State are cyclical in nature. Every 4 to 5 years there is a population explosion that causes big problems for hay farmers. The winter of 2016/2017 proved to be one with a significant jack rabbit population.

The rabbits are not afraid to help themselves to hay stacks when winter weather prevents them from foraging elsewhere. The problem was so bad this past winter that growers had to take to patrolling their hay stacks during the overnight hours to keep the animals away. Some were going so far as to hire friends and family members to take shifts so that coverage would be there all night.

Rabbits cause problems with hay in two ways. First, they chew around the base of hay stacks as they feed. Extensive chewing will destabilize a stack, potentially causing it to come crashing down. Even if that doesn’t happen, there’s a second problem: chewing rabbits can break through baling twine with no problem at all. The combination of instability and broken twine makes loading hay bales a lot more difficult.

Elk and Deer

When elk and deer are a problem for hay stacks, it could be for one of two reasons. First is the same kind of problem that the jack rabbits create. Foraging elk and deer destabilize hay stacks whenever they feed. The destabilization isn’t usually a serious though because elk and deer feed higher up on the stack. But there is a second issue that can create bigger headaches.

Elk and deer have a habit of getting their antlers entangled in hay tarps and anchor ropes. If they get tangled too tightly, they can completely rip down a hay tarp in an attempt to escape. Then the farmer has to replace the tarp and rope in addition to working on any damage done to his property and the hay stack.

So what are hay farmers to do? In Idaho, the Department of Fish and Game has already funded programs for farmers looking to fence their hay stacks. The right kind of fencing can keep deer and elk out. The department may look into funding a solution for the jack rabbits next winter if it looks like another year of unusually high numbers of rabbits.

A jack rabbit solution would be something similar to a mesh screen that could be placed around the base of a stack. Combining both a mesh screen and a decent fence could all but eliminate the risk of critters harming stored hay. Then it would be back to ensuring hay tarps are deployed in such a way as to protect against moisture and debris.

Sources:

Capital Press – http://www.capitalpress.com/Idaho/20170306/east-idaho-hay-farmers-lose-sleep-over-jackrabbits


Canvas Tarps and Cargo Control

Here is a hypothetical scenario between a customer and truck driver who have a slight difference in opinion of how to control and protect cargo. A truck driver arrives to pick up a load from a well-paying customer who insists on using canvas tarps. The trucker is no fan of canvas, being that it is a much heavier material and can be a bit tedious to manage without assistance. But canvas is what the customer wants, so canvas is what the truck driver uses.

Truck drivers may spend some time and energy mulling over their difference in view points with shippers about cargo control and tarping. From our point of view, it is wasted time and energy. Shippers and receivers are paying for the service that truckers provide. Without those shippers and receivers, it would be hard to imagine how cargo management would take place smoothly.Also building a trusting relationship with both, shippers and receivers results in more trucking business.

The Shipper’s View of Cargo

One of the reasons truck drivers struggle with cargo control and carving requirements is a lack of understanding of how shippers and receivers view cargo. This is understandable as each is a subject matter expert in their own right. In fact, truckers view cargo in an entirely different way – as we will explain in the next section. As for shippers and receivers, they see cargo in one of several ways.

First, the cargo a shipper sends on the back of a flatbed truck can be viewed as a source of income. Let’s say the shipper is a manufacturer of paver stones and bricks. Every load sent out on the back of a truck represents a revenue stream. Maximizing revenue is about making sure loads get to their destinations fully intact and without damage. Cargo control and tarping are seen as tools for maximizing revenue streams.

Receivers view cargo in much the same way, though a bit more indirectly. A retailer receiving a load of paver stones and bricks may see those individual pieces as revenue generators, but they are also viewed as part of a much larger inventory that speaks volumes about the retailer’s reputation as a supplier. The retailer cannot afford damaged or blemished products that could harm the business’s reputation.

A third way of viewing cargo is a bit more personal. Take the owner of several classic cars as an example. Those cars are more than just frames with four wheels and an engine. Classic car collectors often treat their vehicles as parts of an extended family. They are investments that are highly personal and, as such, involve an emotional attachment. Truckers would expect a classic car owner to require canvas tarps instead of poly. Canvas is safer for a car’s delicate finish.

The Driver’s View of Cargo

Conflict between truckers and shippers/receivers can arise because of the driver’s different view. For the average truck driver, there is no personal or emotional attachment to cargo. The cargo is not seen as a direct revenue stream either. The trucker is being paid for a service, not for the product on the back of the trailer.

Finn Murphy, a veteran truck driver and mover interviewed by FleetOwner this past July, refers to this view among truckers as the ‘Buddhist view of attachment’. He explains that drivers do not attach any intrinsic value to the cargo they are carrying. It is just freight. Still, Murphy recognizes the trucker’s responsibility to protect that freight at all costs for the benefit of shippers and receivers.

A shipper or receiver may require the use of canvas tarps for any number of reasons. That’s fine. It’s really up to them to decide how they want their cargo protected from point A to point B. Despite the Buddhist view of attachment, it is up to truck drivers to do what makes customers happy.

Sources:

FleetOwner – http://fleetowner.com/driver-management-resource-center/high-end-bedbugger-and-buddhist-view-attachment


5 Things to Know about Canvas Tarps

Mytee Products is proud to carry a selection of canvas tarps alongside our much larger selection of vinyl products. Though vinyl is the clear choice for truck tarps,canvas is a more appropriate material in some circumstances. It is a good idea for flatbed truckers to carry at least a couple of canvas tarps on board just in case shippers or receivers require them.

It could be that you do not know much about canvas because you have no need to know. Well, we want to help you expand your knowledge. There are five things to know about canvas tarps that may influence your decision to use them for cargo control.

1. Canvas Tarps Are Breathable

Canvas is a very breathable material even after being treated for water resistance. By ‘breathable’, we mean it allows air to flow between the individual fibers. Why is this important? Because some flatbed loads are moisture-sensitive. For example, a farmer shipping fresh fruits and vegetables may require the truck driver to use canvas tarps in order to prevent sweating that could cause premature spoilage.

Canvas is also an excellent choice on loads where rust is a concern. Once again, the breathability of canvas prevents moisture from building up underneath. Breathability reduces the risk of rust on loads that will be covered for a considerable length of time.

2. Canvas Tarps Are Environmentally Friendly

Most truck tarps are made of vinyl, polypropylene, or polyethylene. While all three materials are rather strong and able to withstand the punishment of flatbed trucking, neither is necessarily environmentally friendly. Canvas is. Canvas is made from cotton or linen duck fibers. As such, it will not harm the environment even after a tarp wears out and has to be disposed of. Given enough time, a discarded canvas tarp would completely decompose.

3. Canvas Tarps Are Extremely Versatile

We sell canvas tarps primarily to flatbed truckers to help them meet their cargo control needs. Yet canvas is an extremely versatile material that can be used in other ways. Canvas tarps are good for agricultural applications like storing hay or protecting equipment. They are appropriate to the construction industry for transporting and storing lumber, gravel, and other materials. The possible uses of canvas tarps beyond flatbed trucking are extensive, to say the least.

4. Canvas Tarps Can Be Treated or Untreated

Tarp manufacturers sell both treated and untreated products. A treated canvas tarp will be resistant to water, mold and mildew, UV exposure, and more. An untreated product will simply be straight up canvas. Untreated canvas is not 100% waterproof, so truckers need to keep that in mind. It is water resistant thanks to the exceptionally tight weave used in creating canvas tarps.

5. Canvas Tarps Are Easy to Handle

Canvas is known for a number of inherent properties that make the material easy to handle. We have already mentioned the tight weave; this property makes canvas tarps easier to fold than their vinyl counterparts. Canvas is also more slip resistant as well, making it a great material for flatbed trucking at times when snow and ice are a concern. Lastly, because canvas is heavier than vinyl or poly, it also does not blow in the wind as easily. A canvas tarp can be a lot easier to secure under windy conditions than a poly tarp.

Canvas tarps are not the right solution for every cargo control need. But canvas does have a place in the flatbed trucker’s toolbox. If you are in need of a couple of canvas tarps, Mytee Products has just what you’re looking for.


5 Flatbed Trucking Uses for Mesh Tarps

The mesh tarps we sell at Mytee have a lot of great uses around the home, including providing shade on those sunny summer days. We sell a lot of these tarps to construction companies as well. They are used as privacy barriers during both building and road construction. As a flatbed truck driver, you might be interested to know that mesh tarps can be very helpful to your job.

Our truck driving clients tend to buy more lumber, steel, and smoke tarps than anything else. But we do cater to some drivers who need a supply of mesh tarps on hand as well. They buy mesh tarps for five different kinds of loads:

1. Sod Loads

Covering a load of sod is not necessarily to protect it from the weather or flying debris. It is really just to keep everything in place during the trip. The challenge with sod is preventing the sun from cooking it during transport. That’s where mesh tarps come in handy. A steel or lumber tarp would trap too much heat underneath, heat that could kill grass before it ever reaches its destination. And because sod is so fragile, truckers just cannot afford to take chances.Mesh tarps keep everything in place, while still allowing plenty of air circulation.

2. Tree Loads

Flatbed truckers face the same challenges with tree loads that come with hauling sod. They need to use tarps to keep everything in place during transport, but lumber and steel tarps can cook trees. Mesh tarps are the solution. It is also interesting to note that tree loads do not usually have to go great distances. They spend less time under tarps as a result.

3. Agricultural Products

Some agricultural products stacked in crates are better served by steel tarps that can keep the weather out. But like sod and trees, other agricultural products are terribly sensitive to heat. Fresh fruits and vegetables immediately come to mind. A truck driver may load crates of fresh produce and then cover the stack with a couple of mesh tarps to prevent any of the product from flying off during transport. The produce can breathe during transport, reducing the risk of spoilage.

4. Beehives

Transporting beehives is interesting, to say the least. Most times, beekeepers do not need their hives covered during transport because the bees are sedated. But a trip that is longer than usual may require tarping. Once again, mesh tarps are the ideal solution. They allow the hives to get plenty of air while still keeping everything in place.

5. Construction Materials

Using mesh tarps to cover construction materials isn’t routine, but the need does arise from time to time. Think of things like expensive slate tiles or imported paver stones. These kinds of materials are usually wrapped in plastic after being placed on skids. The plastic keeps everything in place, but shippers may ask for a tarp just to prevent any road debris from coming in direct contact with the load. A mesh tarp will do the trick. Truckers prefer the mesh tarp for these loads because it is lighter and easier to apply.

Mytee Products carries high-quality mesh tarps in different sizes and colors. We even have purpose-built mesh tarps made just for bee hauling. You can browse the entire inventory of mesh tarps we carry in our online store. Rest assured that every product we sell is manufactured to the highest standards of quality in accordance with all regulations. When you purchase from Mytee, you are purchasing cargo control equipment and supplies you know you can rely on.