Essential Tools for Cargo Securement

The average consumer has some knowledge on trucking and cargo transportation depending upon their personal relocating experiences. Some truck drivers who are relatively new to the trucking profession tend to be unfamiliar to the tricks of tarping and protecting the load they are about to transport. Yet proper cargo securement is a matter of having the right tools at hand for each job.

Whether someone is new to the profession or is a veteran trucker, at the end of the day, it boils down to remembering and applying the basic rules of cargo securement. It is about preventing a load from shifting in any way that could damage cargo or cause it to fall from the trailer so that it reaches it destination safely.

Here are some essential and helpful tools truckers could use to protect their truckload:

E-Track Straps

E-Track straps are primarily used for dry goods or refrigerated trailers. It is a slotted rail normally installed along both sides of a trailer’s interior at a height matching that of the cargo. The purpose of e-track is to keep the cargo in place and prevent is from sliding around.

This can be accomplished in one of two ways. The first is to use a shoring bar or decking beam made of aluminum and galvanized steel. Each end of the bar is fitted with a mechanism that fits into the e-track and locks into place. A shoring bar can handle pretty substantial loads. Where more flexibility is required, ratchet straps can be used in place of the rigid shoring bar. Straps are attached on both sides of the trailer and ratcheted together in the middle.

truck-straps

Winch Straps

Winch straps tend to be popular with flatbed truck drivers. They are made with heavy duty webbing material that meets or exceeds all DOT regulations and industry standards. They typically come with a flat hook, wire hook or chain anchor on one hand. Winch straps get that name because they are tightened down using a standard winch system. They provide maximum cargo securement strength in a package that is easy to deploy.

Corner and Edge Protectors

Truck drivers never simply back up to a trailer, hook it and go. They have to make sure their loads are secured properly prior to departure. Flatbed drivers have to place tarps over their cargo as well. Tarps are used to protect cargo from varying weather conditions, road situation and while they use the right corner and edge protectors to protect their tarps from wear and tear.

Corner and edge protectors are a great option as there are many choices available depending on the application. For example, a pyramid shaped tarp protector needs to be used if a load may cut or rip the tarp. These small pieces of plastic are placed over sharp corners and secured with webbing.

Another popular option is the v-shaped edge protector. This tool comes in a variety of sizes and can be made of plastic or metal. V-Shaped edge protectors are used to protect cargo, tarps, and straps.

Having the right tools for cargo securement makes the trucker’s job much easier. Mytee Products carries a wide range of essential load securement tools that range from straps to edge protectors to high-quality tarps needed in North America.


The Importance of Tarps for Farmers

If you drive through Chase, Kansas these days, you are likely to see a recently built structure that slightly resembles bridge trusses built over the top of a large, concrete box. You may not know what it is, but locals know that the structure will be used to store grain when complete. It is currently being constructed by an Illinois contractor on behalf of the Central Prairie Co-Op. The storage bin’s owners will use tarps to cover the grain in storage.

The design of the structure is such that grain can be easily loaded and unloaded without compromising the quality of the product. Hay tarps will keep out the weather and, in so doing, prevent the growth of mold and other contaminants within the grain product. Yet the tarps can be easily removed to allow the storage structure to be quickly filled using a dual-purpose chute. The chute will also be used to transfer grain from the storage area to waiting trucks. It is a well thought out design that maximizes storage capacity and efficiency at the same time.

grain-storage

As for the tarps, these will be made from high quality canvas. Canvas tarps are preferred over vinyl in this case because they are more breathable. The additional weight of the canvas will also make it more secure in windy conditions and better able to withstand precipitation and changing temperatures. The design calls for the use of fabric sidewalls, or ‘curtains’, that can be opened or closed as the weather dictates.

Importance of Covering Grain

Covering grain with canvas or tarps is about more than just convenience. Grain is susceptible to different kinds of mold and bacteria growth that could make the product unsuitable for human or animal consumption. Moisture encourages that growth. Keeping the grain dry reduces the risk of contamination and keeps the eventual selling price of the product as high as possible. It also prevents grain fires.

Though it may seem counter intuitive, grain with a moisture content that is too high can spontaneously combust. Once again, it comes down to the growth of bacteria and mold. The right combination of water and oxygen encourages microbial growth within the grain. As bacteria grows and multiplies, it produces heat that is then trapped within the grain. The heat can build up to a point of igniting the grain.

It is for these same reasons farmers cover their hay after harvesting it. They choose tarps rather than out buildings because tarping is a more cost-effective solution that also gives the farmer more flexibility in how his/her land is used when hay storage is not required. Tarps are easy to apply, easy to store and inexpensive enough that they do not significantly affect the farmer’s budget.

Mytee Products carries a full line of vinyl hay tarps in 10 different sizes. Each of our hay tarps is made with heavy-duty polyethylene fabric that has been UV treated. If you need canvas tarps instead, we carry those too. All are made with 100% duck cotton canvas for maximum breathability and durability.

Sources:

1. Hutch News – http://www.hutchnews.com/news/local_state_news/new-grain-storage-rising-ahead-of-the-wheat/article_bccfb95d-e5cb-5b06-8693-9f980a0d6a87.html


Tire Chains and Bad Weather: When to Chain and When to Park

Driving in winter weather is just part of the over the road driving career. There is no way around it. As such, the vast majority of truck drivers have to think about tire chains from time to time. There are two questions to consider in this regard, the first being whether to purchase chains or to use chain banks along major routes that supply them. The second question is one of deciding whether to chain your truck or to park it instead.

The answers to both questions really depend on the individual driver and how much risk he or she is willing to take. Ultimately, though, it is the driver who decides whether to proceed in bad weather or not. Federal and state laws prevent employers or dispatchers from forcing drivers to continue driving when they believe weather conditions endanger their safety.

Tire Chain Basics

Tire chains are available in two basic options: the ladder design and the zigzag design. The ladder chains looks just like a mini version of an aluminum ladder you use to paint your home, except that it’s made with chain links instead of pieces of aluminum. The ‘steps’ of the chain ladder go across the horizontal surface of the tire while the rails fit over the side.

tire-chains

The zigzag tire chain looks a lot like a shoelace, crossing from one side of the tire to the other. A zigzag chain can consist of one or two ‘laces’ held together by two side rails. Some truck drivers prefer this pattern because they believe it provides extra bite; others prefer the ladder design.

Regardless of which type a driver chooses, the chains are applied to the tires and held in place with either additional chains, bungee cords, or rubber rope. It is important for drivers to check chains within a few hundred yards of installation to make sure they are tightly secured. It is possible for chains to fall off during travel if not properly secured.

State Regulations

The states have different regulations when it comes to tire chains. For example, California does not require truckers to use chains in a general sense. However, police do have the authority to prevent truckers from entering certain roadways, under certain weather conditions, without chains. Colorado is a bit stricter.

The laws in Colorado apply to every interstate and state and federal highway when weather conditions warrant. When the regulations are in effect, DOT officials post signs along roadways warning truckers to chain up. Chains can only be removed when bare pavement is encountered on a descending grade.

Parking versus Chaining

Truck drivers ultimately have to decide whether or not to chain or to park. Having said that, some trucking companies have established policies indicating they do not want their drivers ever using chains. If weather were bad enough to require chaining, these companies would prefer drivers pull over and park their rigs instead. They do not want to risk driver or equipment in such bad weather.

Independent contractors do not have the luxury of a company policy making chaining decisions for them. Therefore, they have to consider their own schedules and financial requirements. The one thing that should always be remembered is that human beings cannot be replaced. Delivery schedules can be changed, extra work can be taken to make up for lost income, and equipment can be repaired or replaced. However, a dead trucker is a dead trucker.

Chains are appropriate in certain weather conditions and inappropriate in others. At the end of the day, a driver needs to be objective when it comes to deciding between chaining and parking.